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Bokkilden How to Cheat at Securing Linux - James Stanger - Paperback (9781597492072)
How to Cheat at Securing Linux - James Stanger Pocket
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Forlag:
Syngress Media,U.S.
Innb:
Paperback
Språk:
Engelsk
Sider:
434
Format:
24 x 19 cm
ISBN:
9781597492072
Serie:

How to Cheat at Securing Linux

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Linux servers now account for 33% of all networks servers running worldwide (Source: IDC). The top 3 market share holders in the network server space (IBM, Hewlett-Packard, and Dell) all use Linux as their standard operating system. This book teaches Linux system administrators how to protect their servers from malicious threats. As with any technologies, increased usage results in increased attention from malicious hackers. For years a myth existed that Windows was inherently less secure than Linux, because there were significantly more attacks against Windows machines than Linux. This was a fallacy. There were more attacks against Windows machines because there were simply so many more Windows machines to attack. Now, the numbers tell the exact opposite story. Linux servers account for 1/3 of all servers worldwide, but in 2005 there were 3 times as many high-severity security vulnerabilities discovered on Linux servers (Source: IDC). This book covers Open Source security, implementing an intrusion detection system, unearthing Rootkits, defending against malware, creating Virtual Private Networks, and much more. The Perfect Reference for the Multitasked SysAdmin * Discover Why "Measure Twice, Cut Once" Applies to Securing Linux * Complete Coverage of Hardening the Operating System, Implementing an Intrusion Detection System, and Defending Databases * Short on Theory, History, and Technical Data that Is Not Helpful in Performing Your Job

How to Cheat at Securing Linux

Presenting the Business Case for Open Source Software
1(16)
Introduction
2(1)
The Costs of Using Free Security Solutions
2(3)
Training Costs
2(1)
Hardware Costs
3(1)
Consulting Costs
3(1)
Hidden Costs
4(1)
The Savings of Using Free Security Solutions
5(2)
Purchase Costs
5(1)
Maintenance Costs
6(1)
Customization Costs
6(1)
Comparing Free Solutions with Commercial Solutions
7(6)
Strengths of Free Solutions
7(1)
Weaknesses of Free Solutions
8(2)
Evaluating Individual Solutions
10(3)
``Selling'' a Free Solution
13(2)
Selling by Doing
13(1)
Presenting a Proposal
14(1)
Summary
15(1)
Solutions Fast Track
15(1)
Frequently Asked Questions
16(1)
Hardening the Operating System
17(74)
Introduction
18(1)
Updating the Operating System
18(1)
Red Hat Linux Errata and Update Service Packages
18(1)
Handling Maintenance Issues
19(6)
Red Hat Linux Errata: Fixes and Advisories
20(3)
Bug Fix Case Study
23(2)
Manually Disabling Unnecessary Services and Ports
25(3)
Services to Disable
26(1)
The xinetd.conf File
26(2)
Locking Down Ports
28(4)
Well-Known and Registered Ports
28(2)
Determining Ports to Block
30(1)
Blocking Ports
30(1)
Stand-Alone Services
31(1)
Hardening the System with Bastille
32(10)
Bastille Functions
33(2)
Bastille Versions
35(1)
Implementing Bastille
35(6)
Undoing Bastille Changes
41(1)
Controlling and Auditing Root Access with Sudo
42(14)
System Requirements
44(1)
The Sudo Command
44(1)
Installing Sudo
45(2)
Configuring Sudo
47(3)
Running Sudo
50(2)
No Password
52(1)
Sudo Logging
53(3)
Managing Your Log Files
56(1)
Using Logging Enhancers
57(6)
Swatch
57(2)
Scanlogd
59(2)
Syslogd-ng
61(2)
Security Enhanced Linux
63(5)
Securing Novell SUSE Linux
68(6)
Firewall Configuration
72(2)
Novell AppArmor
74(3)
Host Intrusion Prevention System
77(2)
Linux Benchmark Tools
79(5)
Summary
84(1)
Solutions Fast Track
85(4)
Frequently Asked Questions
89(2)
Enumeration and Scanning Your Network
91(30)
Introduction
92(1)
Scanning
92(1)
Enumeration
92(2)
How Scanning Works
94(4)
Port Scanning
94(2)
Going Behind the Scenes with Enumeration
96(1)
Service Identification
96(1)
RPC Enumeration
97(1)
Fingerprinting
97(1)
Open Source Tools
98(21)
Scanning
98(1)
Fyodor's nmap
98(5)
netenum: Ping Sweep
103(1)
unicornscan: Port Scan
103(1)
scanrand: Port Scan
104(2)
Enumeration
106(1)
nmap: Banner Grabbing
106(6)
Windows Enumeration: smbgetserverinfo/smbdumpusers
112(4)
Summary
116(3)
Frequently Asked Questions
119(2)
Introducing Intrusion Detection and Snort
121(36)
Introduction
122(1)
How an IDS Works
123(3)
What Will an IDS Do for Me?
124(1)
What Won't an IDS Do for Me?
125(1)
Where Snort Fits
126(1)
Snort System Requirements
127(2)
Hardware
127(1)
Operating System
128(1)
Other Software
128(1)
Exploring Snort's Features
129(7)
Packet Sniffer
130(1)
Preprocessor
131(1)
Detection Engine
132(1)
Alerting/Logging Component
133(3)
Using Snort on Your Network
136(15)
Snort's Uses
138(1)
Using Snort as a Packet Sniffer and Logger
138(5)
Using Snort as an NIDS
143(1)
Snort and Your Network Architecture
143(4)
Snort and Switched Networks
147(2)
Pitfalls When Running Snort
149(1)
False Alerts
150(1)
Upgrading Snort
150(1)
Security Considerations with Snort
151(3)
Snort Is Susceptible to Attacks
151(1)
Securing Your Snort System
152(2)
Summary
154(1)
Solutions Fast Track
154(2)
Frequently Asked Questions
156(1)
Installing and Configuring Snort and Add-Ons
157(24)
Placing Your NIDS
158(2)
Configuring Snort on Linux
160(12)
Configuring Snort Options
160(5)
Using a GUI Front-End for Snort
165(1)
Basic Analysis and Security Engine
165(7)
Other Snort Add-Ons
172(3)
Using Oinkmaster
173(1)
Additional Research
174(1)
Demonstrating Effectiveness
175(2)
Summary
177(1)
Solutions Fast Track
177(1)
Frequently Asked Questions
178(3)
Advanced Snort Deployment
181(22)
Introduction
182(1)
Monitoring the Network
182(1)
VLAN
182(1)
Configuring Channel Bonding for Linux
183(1)
Snort Rulesets
184(4)
Plug-Ins
188(1)
Preprocessor Plug-Ins
188(7)
Detection Plug-Ins
195(1)
Output Plug-Ins
196(1)
Snort Inline
196(1)
Solving Specific Security Requirements
197(3)
Policy Enforcement
197(1)
Catching Internal Policy Violators
197(1)
Banned IP Address Watchlists
198(1)
Network Operations Support
198(1)
Forensics and Incident Handling
198(2)
Summary
200(1)
Solutions Fast Track
200(2)
Frequently Asked Questions
202(1)
Network Analysis, Troubleshooting, and Packet Sniffing
203(46)
Introduction
204(1)
What Is Network Analysis and Sniffing?
204(3)
Who Uses Network Analysis?
207(5)
How Are Intruders Using Sniffers?
207(2)
What Does Sniffed Data Look Like?
209(1)
Common Network Analyzers
210(2)
How Does It Work?
212(19)
Explaining Ethernet
212(1)
Understanding the Open Systems Interconnection Model
213(2)
Layer 1: Physical
215(1)
Layer 2: Data Link
215(2)
Layer 3: Network
217(1)
Layer 4: Transport
218(2)
Layer 5: Session
220(1)
Layer 6: Presentation
221(1)
Layer 7: Application
221(2)
CSMA/CD
223(1)
The Major Protocols: IP, TCP, UDP, and ICMP
224(1)
IP
224(1)
Internet Control Message Protocol
225(1)
TCP
225(1)
UDP
226(1)
Hardware: Cable Taps, Hubs, and Switches
226(2)
Port Mirroring
228(1)
Defeating Switches
229(2)
Sniffing Wireless
231(2)
Hardware Requirements
231(1)
Software
232(1)
Protocol Dissection
233(6)
DNS
233(2)
NTP
235(1)
HTTP
236(2)
SMTP
238(1)
Protecting Against Sniffers
239(2)
Network Analysis and Policy
241(5)
Frequently Asked Questions
246(3)
Basics of Cryptography and Encryption
249(22)
Introduction
250(1)
Algorithms
250(10)
What Is Encryption?
251(1)
Symmetric Encryption Algorithms
251(1)
Data Encryption Standard and Triple Data Encryption Standard
252(1)
Advanced Encryption Standard (Rijndael)
253(1)
IDEA
254(1)
Asymmetric Encryption Algorithms
255(1)
Diffie-Hellman
256(1)
El Gamal
257(1)
RSA
258(1)
Hashing Algorithms
258(2)
Concepts of Using Cryptography
260(7)
Confidentiality
261(1)
Integrity
262(1)
Digital Signatures
263(1)
MITM Attacks
263(2)
Authentication
265(1)
Non-Repudiation
265(1)
Access Control
265(1)
One-time Pad
265(2)
Summary
267(1)
Solutions Fast Track
267(2)
Frequently Asked Questions
269(2)
Perimeter Security, DMZs, Remote Access, and VPNs
271(70)
Introduction
272(1)
Firewall Types
272(2)
Firewall Architectures
274(4)
Screened Subnet
274(2)
One-Legged
276(1)
True DMZ
277(1)
Implementing Firewalls
278(47)
Hardware versus Software Firewalls
278(1)
Configuring netfilter
279(1)
Choosing a Linux Version
279(1)
Choosing Installation Media
279(3)
Linux Firewall Operation
282(5)
Configuration Examples
287(11)
GUIs
298(18)
Smoothwall
316(9)
Providing Secure Remote Access
325(13)
Providing VPN Access
326(2)
OpenSSL VPN
328(1)
Pros
329(1)
Cons
330(1)
Using the X Window System
331(7)
Summary
338(1)
Solutions Fast Track
338(2)
Frequently Asked Questions
340(1)
Linux Bastion Hosts
341(42)
Introduction
342(1)
System Installation
342(4)
Disk Partitions
343(1)
Choosing a Linux Version
343(1)
Choosing Distribution Media
344(1)
Choosing a Specific Distribution
345(1)
Removing Optional Components
346(7)
Minimizing Services
347(2)
Removing Optional Software
349(3)
Choosing a Window Manager
352(1)
Additional Steps
353(9)
Configure Automatic Time Synchronization
353(2)
Patching and Updates
355(1)
Updating Software Packages
355(1)
Updating the Kernel
356(1)
Removing SUID Programs
357(1)
SELinux Policy Development
357(2)
TCP/IP Stack Hardening
359(1)
Automated Hardening Scripts
360(2)
Controlling Access to Resources
362(4)
Address-Based Access Control
362(1)
Configuring TCP Wrappers
362(1)
Configuring IPTables
363(3)
Auditing Access to Resources
366(4)
Enabling the Audit Daemon
366(1)
Enabling the Syslog Daemon
367(1)
Viewing and Managing the Logs
368(1)
Configuring Swatch
368(1)
Configuring Logwatch
369(1)
Remote Administration
370(3)
SSH
371(1)
Remote GUI
372(1)
Bastion Host Configurations
373(6)
Configuring a Web Server
373(1)
Configuring an FTP Server
374(2)
Configuring an SMTP Relay Server
376(1)
Configuring a DNS Server
377(2)
Bastion Host Maintenance and Support
379(1)
Linux Bastion Host Checklist
379(1)
Summary
380(1)
Solutions Fast Track
380(2)
Frequently Asked Questions
382(1)
Apache Web Server Hardening
383(20)
Understanding Common
Vulnerabilities Within Apache Web Server
384(1)
Poor Application Configuration
384(1)
Unsecured Web-Based Code
384(1)
Inherent Apache Security Flaws
384(1)
Foundational OS Vulnerabilities
385(1)
Patching and Securing the OS
385(1)
Patching Unix, Linux, and BSD Operating Systems
386(1)
Configuring a Secure Operating System
386(1)
Hardening the Apache Application
386(14)
Prepare the OS for Apache Web Server
387(1)
Acquire, Compile, and Install Apache Web Server Software
388(1)
Verify Source Code Integrity
388(1)
Compile the Source Code
388(4)
Configure the httpd.conf File
392(1)
Recommended modsecurity.conf File
393(1)
User Directives
394(1)
Performance/Denial-of-Service (DoS) Directives
395(1)
Server Software Obfuscation Directives
396(1)
Access Control Directives
396(1)
Authentication Mechanisms
397(1)
Directory Functionality Directives
398(1)
Logging Directives
398(1)
Remove Default/Unneeded Apache Files
399(1)
Update Ownership/Permissions
400(1)
Monitoring the Server for Secure Operation
400(3)
Index 403
Biografi
Linux servers now account for 33% of all networks servers running worldwide (Source: IDC). The top 3 market share holders in the network server space (IBM, Hewlett-Packard, and Dell) all use Linux as their standard operating system. This book teaches Linux system administrators how to protect their ... Les mer
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