Gå til våre mobile nettsider
Bokkilden The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities - Lawrence Shulman - Audiovisuell/Multimedia (9780495506089)
The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities - Lawrence Shulman Audiovisuell/Multimedia
Del med andre
Utgitt:
Forlag:
Cengage Learning, Inc
Språk:
Engelsk
Sider:
672
Format:
26 x 21 cm
ISBN:
9780495506089
Utgave:
6

The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities

av
Leveringstid: Usikker*
*Vi bestiller varen fra forlag i utlandet. Dersom varen finnes, sender vi den så snart vi får den til lager
Legg i handlekurv
Vår pris: 638,-
Preface xxiii
PART I A Model of the Helping Process
1(50)
An Interactional Approach to Helping
2(32)
Social Work Practice Theory
3(2)
The Client-System Interaction
5(7)
An Interactional Assessment Approach
7(5)
Underlying Assumptions in the Interactional Model
12(9)
Assumption of Symbiosis
12(3)
Assumption of Obstacles in the Engagement
15(1)
The Increasing Complexity of Human Social Systems
16(1)
Divergence in Self-Interest and Social Interest
17(1)
Problems of Interpersonal Communication
18(2)
Assumption of Strength for Change
20(1)
The Social Work Profession: A Historical Perspective
21(7)
The Roots of the Profession
22(2)
The Function of the Social Work Profession
24(4)
Social Work Skill and the Working Relationship
28(3)
The Integration of Personal and Professional Selves
31(2)
Chapter Summary
33(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
33(1)
Human Behavior and the Social Environment
34(17)
Oppression Psychology
35(7)
The Master-Slave Paradigm
36(1)
Indicators of Oppression
37(2)
Alienation and Psychopathology
39(2)
Methods of Defense Against Oppression
41(1)
Resilience Theory and Research
42(7)
Developmental Psychology Theory and Research
43(4)
Resilience and Life-Span Theory
47(1)
More Recent Views on Resilience
48(1)
Implications for Social Work Practice
49(1)
Chapter Summary
50(1)
PART II Social Work With Individuals
51(160)
The Preliminary Phase of Work
52(22)
Communications in Practice
53(2)
Obstacles to Direct Communication
53(1)
Examples of Indirect Communication in Practice
54(1)
The Preliminary Phase: Tuning In to the Self and to the Client
55(6)
Tuning In to the Authority Theme
56(3)
The Impact of Diversity and Culturally Competent Practice
59(2)
Elements of the Working Relationship
61(12)
Affective Versus Intellectual Tuning In
63(2)
Tuning In to One's Own Feelings
65(1)
Different Levels of Tuning In
66(2)
Responding Directly to Indirect Cues
68(5)
Chapter Summary
73(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
73(1)
Beginnings and the Contracting Skills
74(37)
The Dynamics of New Relationships
76(5)
Contracting in First Sessions
81(5)
The Impact of Context on Practice
81(1)
Contracting Example
82(2)
Some Variant Elements in Contracting
84(2)
Research Findings on Contracting
86(1)
Contracting Over Time
86(2)
Contracting With Resistant Clients
88(11)
Models for Assessment in the Beginning Phase
99(3)
Culturally Diverse Practice Examples
102(7)
Working With Mexican Americans
103(1)
Working With African Americans
104(2)
Working With American Indians
106(1)
Working With Canadian Indians
107(1)
Issues in Cross-Racial Practice
107(2)
Education and Training for Culturally Sensitive Practice
109(1)
Chapter Summary
110(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
110(1)
Skills in the Work Phase
111(68)
A Model of the Work Phase Interview
112(1)
Work Phase Summary
113(3)
Preliminary Phase
113(1)
Beginning Phase
113(1)
Middle Phase
113(2)
Endings and Transitions
115(1)
Sessional Tuning-In Skills
116(6)
Tuning In to the Client's Sense of Urgency
116(2)
Tuning In to the Worker's Own Feelings
118(1)
Tuning In to the Meaning of the Client's Struggle
119(1)
Tuning In and the Worker's Realities of Time and Stress
120(1)
Tuning In to the Worker's Own Life Experiences
121(1)
Sessional Contracting Skills
122(3)
Working From the Client's Sense of Urgency
122(2)
Research on Sessional Contracting
124(1)
Impact of the Medical Paradigm on Sessional Contracting
124(1)
Elaborating Skills
125(7)
Containment
125(1)
Moving From the General to the Specific
126(1)
Focused Listening
127(1)
Questioning
128(1)
Reaching Inside of Silences
129(3)
Empathic Skills
132(7)
Reaching for Feelings
135(1)
Displaying Understanding of the Client's Feelings
136(1)
Putting the Client's Feelings Into Words
137(1)
Research on Empathy
138(1)
Sharing the Worker's Feelings
139(8)
Integrating the Personal and the Professional
139(1)
When the Worker Is Angry With the Client
140(2)
A Worker's Investment in the Success of the Client
142(1)
A Worker Sharing Feelings Associated With Life Experiences
143(1)
Boundary Issues in Sharing the Worker's Feelings
143(1)
Sexual Transference and Countertransference Feelings
144(1)
Research on Sharing Feelings
145(2)
Making a Demand for Work
147(7)
Partializing Client Concerns
150(2)
Holding to Focus
152(1)
Checking for Underlying Ambivalence
152(1)
Challenging the Illusion of Work
153(1)
Pointing Out Obstacles
154(7)
Supporting Clients in Taboo Areas
155(3)
Dealing With the Authority Theme
158(3)
Identifying Process and Content Connections
161(4)
Process and Content That Address the Authority Theme
161(1)
Impact of the Worker's Emotions
162(3)
Sharing Data
165(6)
Providing Relevant Data
166(2)
Providing Data in a Way That Is Open to Examination and Challenge
168(1)
Providing Data as a Personal View
169(1)
Ethical Dilemmas in Withholding Data
170(1)
Helping the Client See Life in New Ways
171(1)
Sessional Ending and Transition Skills
172(5)
Summarizing
173(1)
Generalizing
173(1)
Identifying the Next Steps
174(1)
Rehearsing
175(1)
Identifying ``Doorknob'' Communications
176(1)
Chapter Summary
177(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
178(1)
Endings and Transitions
179(32)
The Dynamics and Skills of Endings
181(10)
Flow of Affect in the Ending Phase
181(1)
Timing and the Ending Phase
182(1)
Stages of the Ending Phase
183(1)
Denial
183(2)
Indirect and Direct Expressions of Anger
185(2)
Mourning
187(3)
Trying It On for Size
190(1)
The Farewell-Party Syndrome
190(1)
The Skills of Transitions
191(9)
Identification of Major Learning
191(3)
Identification of Areas for Future Work
194(1)
Synthesizing the Ending Process and Content
195(1)
Transitions to New Experiences and Support Systems
196(4)
Variations on Endings
200(10)
Ending a Relationship That Never Really Began
200(2)
Endings Caused by the Termination of the Worker's Job
202(2)
Endings Caused by the Death of the Client
204(1)
Traumatic Events and Their Impact on a Worker's Practice
204(1)
Suicide on a Caseload
205(3)
Working With a Dying Client
208(2)
Chapter Summary
210(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
210(1)
PART III Social Work With Families
211(70)
The Preliminary and Beginning Phases in Family Practice
212(31)
What Constitutes a Family?
213(1)
Social Work With Families
214(2)
Family Support and Family Counseling
214(1)
Setting-Specific Work With Families
215(1)
The Unique Issues Associated With Family Dynamics
215(1)
Selected Concepts From Family Therapy Theory
216(5)
Psychodynamic
216(1)
Bowen Family Systems Theory
217(1)
Person-Centered
218(1)
Cognitive-Behavioral Family Therapy (CBFT)
219(1)
Multi-Systemic Model (MST)
219(1)
Core Concepts Across Theories
220(1)
The Preliminary Phase---Tuning In to the Family
221(1)
Agency Themes
221(1)
Authority Themes
221(1)
Family Work Themes
221(1)
The Two-Client Concept and the Worker's Role
222(3)
The Beginning Phase: Contracting With the Family
225(6)
The Problem-Oriented First Family Interview for the Beginner
225(2)
First Family Session With an Angry Father
227(1)
Description of the Curakis Family
227(1)
Precipitating Incident
227(1)
History
227(1)
The Interview
228(1)
Discussion of This First Family Session
229(2)
The Impact of Culture and Community
231(11)
Racism, Oppression, and the Native American Family
232(2)
A White Worker with a Native American Family
234(5)
Family Assessment Models
239(3)
Chapter Summary
242(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
242(1)
The Middle and Ending Phases in Family Practice
243(17)
The Middle Phase in Family Practice
243(1)
A Framework for Analyzing a Family Session
244(2)
The Work Phase Model
244(2)
Dealing With Family Secrets
246(2)
A Middle Phase Family Session
248(7)
The Record-of-Service Recording Device
248(7)
The Ending and Transition Phase
255(4)
Goals of the Ending/Transition Phase
255(1)
Emotional Reactions to the Ending Process in Family Counseling
256(1)
Ending the Sessions Before the Worker Believes They Are Finished
257(1)
The Impact of Ignoring Issues of Race, Class, and Culture
257(1)
Ending a Relationship Because of a Change in the Worker's Job Status
258(1)
Chapter Summary
259(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
259(1)
Variations in Family Practice
260(21)
The Impact of Setting and Service
261(1)
The Child Welfare Setting
262(11)
Work With Foster Parents
262(1)
Supporting the Foster Parent as She Supports the Foster Child
263(3)
Foster Parent Anger Over Erratic Visits With Biological Mother
266(2)
Work With Children in Residential Care
268(1)
Social Work Behind the Steering Wheel
268(3)
Work With Teen Parents and Their Families of Origin
271(1)
Children Raising Children: Work With a Teenage Parent
272(1)
Family Practice in the School Setting
273(5)
A High School Freshman With ADD
273(5)
Work With a Single-Parent Family
278(2)
Chapter Summary
280(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
280(1)
PART IV Social Work With Groups
281(244)
The Preliminary Phase in Group Practice: The Group as a Mutual-Aid System
282(37)
The ``Fear-of-Groups'' Syndrome
284(2)
The Dynamics of Mutual Aid
286(9)
Sharing Data
286(1)
The Dialectical Process
287(1)
Discussing a Taboo Area
288(1)
The ``All-in-the-Same-Boat'' Phenomenon
288(1)
Developing a Universal Perspective
289(1)
Mutual Support
290(1)
Mutual Demand
291(1)
Individual Problem-Solving
292(1)
Rehearsal
292(2)
The ``Strength-in-Numbers'' Phenomenon
294(1)
Obstacles to Mutual Aid
295(1)
The Function of the Group Leader
296(1)
Group Formation
297(11)
Preparing for Group Work
297(1)
Work With the Staff System
298(1)
Achieving Consensus on the Service
299(5)
Identifying Group Type and Structure
304(2)
Group Versus Individual Work With Clients
306(1)
Agency or Setting Support for Groups
307(1)
Group Composition, Timing, and Structure
308(6)
Group Member Selection
309(2)
Group Timing
311(2)
Group Structure, Setting, and Rules
313(1)
Work With Prospective Members
314(4)
Worker Skills in the Initial Interviews
315(3)
Chapter Summary
318(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
318(1)
The Beginning Phase in the Group
319(60)
The Dynamics of First Group Sessions
320(1)
The Couples' Group: An Illustration
321(18)
The Initial Work
322(9)
The Work Continues
331(6)
Ending and Transition
337(2)
Variations on First Group Sessions
339(17)
Working With Children and Adolescents
339(1)
Foster Adolescents in a Child Welfare Setting
340(1)
Setting Limits: An Adolescent Acting-Out Boys' Group
340(3)
Impact of Authority: Involuntary Groups
343(1)
Stages-of-Change Model
344(1)
Male Batterers
345(1)
Driving While Intoxicated (DWI)
346(2)
Working With Specific Client Problems
348(1)
Parents of Children With Cerebral Palsy
348(1)
Women With Multiple Sclerosis (MS): Crying in the First Session
349(1)
Impact of the Setting
350(1)
Patient Ward Group in a Hospital
351(1)
Impact of Time
352(1)
Short-Term Group for Single Parents in a Rural Setting
352(4)
Recontracting
356(7)
Recontracting With One's Own Group
357(1)
A Group in a Shelter for Battered Women
357(6)
Coleadership in Groups---Contracting on Purpose
363(8)
A Coleadership Conflict Example: The Social Work Intern and the Substance Abuse Counselor in a Dual-Diagnosis Group
365(6)
The Open-Ended Group
371(3)
Hospital Group on a Gynecological Ward
372(1)
Bringing a New Member Into an AIDS Group
373(1)
The Single-Session Group
374(3)
Information Group: Foster Parent Recruitment
375(1)
Informal Event Group: Remembering the Holocaust
376(1)
Chapter Summary
377(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
378(1)
The Work Phase in the Group
379(42)
The False Dichotomy Between the Individual and the Group
380(1)
Sessional Contracting in the Group
380(12)
Reaching for an Individual's Communication in the Group
381(1)
Illustration from the 19th Session of the Married Couples Group
382(3)
The Lost and Found Group: Children Grieving the Loss of a Family Member
385(1)
Friends, Lovers, and Relatives: Grieving the Loss of a Person With AIDS
386(1)
Open-Ended Group in a VA Hospital on the Anniversary of 9/11
387(1)
Reaching for the Group Response to the Individual
388(1)
Day Treatment Group for Persons With Chronic Mental Illness
388(1)
Reaching for the Work When Obstacles Threaten
389(1)
Teenager in a Residential Center, Raising a Difficult Subject
390(1)
Mothers of Children Diagnosed with Hyperactivity
391(1)
Mothers of Sixth-Grade Boys Who Underachieve in School
392(1)
The Work Phase in a Group Session
392(10)
Helping the Group Work Over Time
393(1)
Puerto Rican Pregnant Teens
393(6)
Focusing the Group on Problem-Solving Mutual Aid
399(1)
Adult Group Dealing With Separation and Depression
399(3)
Sessional Endings and Transitions
402(2)
Mothers of Children Diagnosed as Hyperactive
402(2)
Activity Groups
404(15)
The Functions of Shared Activity in Mutual Aid Groups
404(1)
Two Categories of Activity Groups
405(1)
Children Dealing With Their Parents' Separation and Divorce
406(11)
Vietnamese Immigrant Women
417(2)
Chapter Summary
419(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
419(2)
Working With the Individual and the Group
421(79)
The Concept of Role in a Dynamic System
422(2)
The Impact of Oppression on Social Role
422(1)
Formal and Informal Roles in the Group
423(1)
The Scapegoat
424(8)
A Scapegoating Example
425(1)
African American and Hispanic Teenage Girls in a School
425(7)
Dealing With the Scapegoating Pattern
432(1)
The ``Deviant'' Member
432(5)
Extreme Versus Mild Deviance
433(1)
Foster Parent Recruitment Group Example
433(1)
Foster Parent Support Group
434(1)
Reaching for the Underlying Message of Deviant Behavior
434(1)
Group for Children Having Trouble in School
434(1)
Deviant Behavior as a Functional Role
435(1)
Counseling Group at a Psychiatric Hospital
435(1)
Opening a Discussion of the Group's Functioning
435(1)
Deepening Discussion in a Parenting Group
436(1)
The Internal Leader
437(3)
Dealing With Acting-Out Adolescents: A Community Center Group
437(3)
The Gatekeeper
440(2)
The Defensive Member
442(9)
A Defensive Father in a Parents' Group
442(2)
Denial in a Living-With-Cancer Group
444(7)
The Quiet Member
451(2)
Worker Strategies
451(1)
The Member Who Is Afraid to Speak
452(1)
The Member Who Feels Left Out
452(1)
The Monopolizer
453(2)
The Group as an Organism
455(2)
Developmental Tasks for the Group
457(13)
Dealing With the Relationship to the Leader
458(1)
Who Owns the Group? Issues of Control
458(1)
The Couples' Group and the Authority Theme
458(2)
The Group Leader as the Outsider
460(1)
Parents of Hyperactive Children and the Authority Theme
460(1)
The Group Leader's Demand for Work
461(1)
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Vietnam Veterans Group
461(7)
The Group Leader's Limitations
468(1)
The Group Leader as a Caring and Giving Person
469(1)
Dealing With the Relationships Among Members
470(28)
College Student Counseling Group and the Intimacy Theme
471(2)
Intimacy and the Relational Model
473(1)
Paradox
474(1)
Connection
474(1)
Resonance
475(1)
A Support Group for Women With Cancer
475(6)
Developing a Culture for Work
481(1)
Parents of Hyperactive Children: Accepting Difficult Feelings
482(4)
Married Couples: Legitimizing the Expression of Anger
486(1)
Married Couples: Dealing With Sexual Taboos
487(1)
White Workers With African American Inner-City High School Girls: From ``Anger Management'' to Mutual Aid Support
488(7)
Residential Center for Young Men in the Criminal Justice System
495(1)
Developing a Structure for Work
496(1)
An Outpatient Group for Young Recovering Addicts
496(2)
Chapter Summary
498(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
498(2)
Endings and Transitions With Groups
500(25)
Ending and Transition Phase in Groups
501(3)
Denial
501(1)
Anger
501(1)
Mourning
502(1)
Trying It on for Size
502(1)
Farewell-Party Syndrome
503(1)
Worker Strategies With Regard to Ending
503(1)
Worker Strategies With Regard to Transition
504(1)
Group Illustrations
504(19)
Patients With Multiple Sclerosis
505(2)
Children's Group in an Elementary School
507(2)
Male Batterers' Group
509(2)
Female Worker's Last Session With Men in a Correctional Setting
511(1)
Adult Female Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse: Endings Over Time
512(7)
A Termination Session: The Worker Leaving the Group in a Residential Setting
519(4)
Chapter Summary
523(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
524(1)
PART V Macro Social Work Practice: Impacting the Agency/Setting and the Community, and Effecting Social Change
525(94)
Professional Impact and Helping Clients Negotiate the System
526(47)
Macro-Practice
527(2)
A Social Systems Approach
527(2)
The Individual-System Interaction
529(1)
Mediating the Individual-System Engagement
530(24)
Native Worker and a White Teacher
531(2)
Work With the School System When a Student is Suspended
533(6)
Family Court Group for Parents of Truant Children: Race, Class, and Conflict With Teachers in a School
539(5)
Work With a Psychiatrist in a Hospital Setting
544(5)
Confrontation, Social Pressure, and Advocacy
549(1)
Finding Housing for an Overwhelmed Client: A Canadian Example
550(4)
Professional Impact on the System
554(3)
Factors That Make Professional Impact Difficult
556(1)
System Resistance and the Pre-Contemplation Stage
556(1)
Fear of Retribution
556(1)
Stereotyped Views of Administration
557(1)
From Individual Problems to Social Action
557(4)
Illustrations of Agency Change
558(1)
Hospital Emergency Room Service
558(2)
Rehabilitation Institution for Paraplegics
560(1)
Sexuality in a Home for the Aged
561(1)
Professional Impact and Interstaff Relationships
561(8)
The Agency as a Social System
562(1)
Problems Associated With ``Process-Focused'' Staff Meetings
563(1)
Dealing With Process in Relation to a Problem or Issue
563(1)
Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Work With a Client
564(1)
Interdepartmental Communications in a Large System
565(4)
Impact on Relations With Staff at Other Agencies
569(3)
Emergency Services Workers in Conflict With Hospital Staff
569(2)
The ``Too Many Cooks'' Problem
571(1)
Externalizing the Problem: It's Always the Other Person's Fault
571(1)
Chapter Summary
572(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
572(1)
Social Work Practice in the Community---Philosophy, Models, and Principles
573(11)
The Development of Community Social Work Practice
574(1)
Empowerment-Oriented and Progressive Practice Models
574(1)
Principles of Effective Community Organizing
575(1)
Community Organizing Philosophy and Models
576(5)
Grassroots Community Organizing
577(1)
Community Organizing Around a Specific Issue
578(1)
Rural-Based Community Organization Practice
579(1)
The Use of the Internet in Community Practice
580(1)
The Neighborhood as Community
581(1)
The Role of the Worker in the Community
582(1)
Chapter Summary
583(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
583(1)
Community Organization and Social Action Practice
584(35)
The Phases of Work in Community Organizing Practice
585(28)
The Preliminary and Beginning Phase of Community Practice
585(1)
Contracting: A Tenants' Group in Public Housing
585(3)
The SNCC: Starting Where the Client (Community) Is
588(1)
The Middle or Work Phase of Practice
588(1)
Structure and Maintenance: A Citizen's Antipoverty Action Group
588(3)
The Deviant Member: Community-Based Citizens' Advisory Board
591(1)
Mothers on Welfare in Public Housing: Negotiating the Environment
592(10)
Mobilizing Adolescent Peer Leaders in the Community
602(5)
The Ending/Transition Phase of Practice: The Milieu as Community
607(1)
Patient Empowerment Through a Newspaper in a VA Hospital
607(6)
Social Workers and Social Action
613(4)
Social Action in the Community
614(3)
Advocacy Groups and Political Activity
617(1)
Chapter Summary
617(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
618(1)
PART VI Practice Models, Evidence-Based Practice, Agency Policies, Ethics, Legislation, and the Courts
619(60)
Additional Social Work Perspectives and Evidence-Based Practice
620(35)
Solution-Focused Practice
621(2)
Major Assumptions on the Nature of the Helping Relationship
621(1)
Defining Techniques
622(1)
Radical Social Work Practice
623(1)
Feminist Practice
624(3)
Historical Roots
624(1)
Feminist Practice Typology
624(1)
``Take Back the Night'' March: An Example
625(1)
The New Psychology of Women
626(1)
Feminist Group Work
627(1)
Social Work as Psychotherapy
627(1)
Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
627(4)
Some Cautions Related to Models From Other Disciplines
629(2)
Evolving Models of Practice
631(14)
Religion and Spirituality
631(1)
Definitions
632(1)
Interventions: The Spiritual/Religious Autobiography
633(1)
Practice in Response to Trauma and Extreme Events
634(1)
Crisis Theory and Crisis Intervention
635(1)
Crisis Intervention Stress Management
636(1)
Trauma Groups
637(1)
Forgiveness Exercises
638(1)
Impact of Disaster on the Professional
639(1)
Working With Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgender Clients
639(1)
Definitions
640(1)
The Oppression Perspective
640(2)
The Strengths Perspective for LGBT Clients
642(1)
Strategies for LGBT Sensitive Practice: The School Social Worker Example
642(2)
Summary of Other Models and Evolving Models of Practice
644(1)
Evidence-Based Practice
645(3)
An Illustration: Motivational Interviewing
647(1)
Evaluation of Practice: Process and Outcomes
648(6)
Process Evaluation: The Record of Service
649(2)
Outcome Evaluation: The Single-System Research Design
651(1)
The Scientist-Practitioner Model
652(2)
Chapter Summary
654(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
654(1)
The Impact of the Agency Culture, Ethics, Legislation, and Evaluation
655(24)
The Agency Culture
656(2)
Values and Ethics in Social Work Practice
658(9)
Definitions of Values and Ethics
658(1)
National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics
659(1)
Historical Context
659(2)
Ethical Problems and Dilemmas
661(1)
Factors That Affect Ethical Decision-Making
662(2)
Values and Ethics in the Professional Literature
664(1)
Guidelines for Practice in Family and Group Work
664(3)
Social Changes and Their Impact on Ethical Practice
667(3)
Managed Care
667(2)
End-of-Life Decisions
669(1)
The Impact of Legislation and the Court
670(6)
Licensing and the Social Work Profession
671(1)
Confidentiality and Privileged Communications
671(3)
Informed Consent
674(1)
The Duty to Warn
675(1)
Chapter Summary
676(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
677(2)
Glossary 679(10)
References 689(8)
Index of Case Examples 697(4)
Name Index 701(3)
Subject Index 704
Lawrence Shulman's THE SKILLS OF HELPING INDIVIDUALS, FAMILIES, GROUPS, AND COMMUNITIES WITH CD, 6e, demonstrates how common elements, core processes, and skills exist across all stages of helping and throughout work with all populations--including individuals, families, groups, and communities. It defines, illustrates, and teaches helping skills and provides manageable models for understanding them. The text also looks at the underlying process and its associated set of core skills. Two valuable CD-ROMs are available to enhance your learning experience. THE INTERACTIVE SKILLS OF HELPING CD-ROM and WORKSHOP CD-ROM FOR THE SKILLS OF HELPING illustrate the text's core skills and feature video excerpts of an interactive workshop led by Dr. Shulman. Examples depict social workers in action and directly connect theory and research to the realities of working with clients.

The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities

Preface xxiii
PART I A Model of the Helping Process
1(50)
An Interactional Approach to Helping
2(32)
Social Work Practice Theory
3(2)
The Client-System Interaction
5(7)
An Interactional Assessment Approach
7(5)
Underlying Assumptions in the Interactional Model
12(9)
Assumption of Symbiosis
12(3)
Assumption of Obstacles in the Engagement
15(1)
The Increasing Complexity of Human Social Systems
16(1)
Divergence in Self-Interest and Social Interest
17(1)
Problems of Interpersonal Communication
18(2)
Assumption of Strength for Change
20(1)
The Social Work Profession: A Historical Perspective
21(7)
The Roots of the Profession
22(2)
The Function of the Social Work Profession
24(4)
Social Work Skill and the Working Relationship
28(3)
The Integration of Personal and Professional Selves
31(2)
Chapter Summary
33(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
33(1)
Human Behavior and the Social Environment
34(17)
Oppression Psychology
35(7)
The Master-Slave Paradigm
36(1)
Indicators of Oppression
37(2)
Alienation and Psychopathology
39(2)
Methods of Defense Against Oppression
41(1)
Resilience Theory and Research
42(7)
Developmental Psychology Theory and Research
43(4)
Resilience and Life-Span Theory
47(1)
More Recent Views on Resilience
48(1)
Implications for Social Work Practice
49(1)
Chapter Summary
50(1)
PART II Social Work With Individuals
51(160)
The Preliminary Phase of Work
52(22)
Communications in Practice
53(2)
Obstacles to Direct Communication
53(1)
Examples of Indirect Communication in Practice
54(1)
The Preliminary Phase: Tuning In to the Self and to the Client
55(6)
Tuning In to the Authority Theme
56(3)
The Impact of Diversity and Culturally Competent Practice
59(2)
Elements of the Working Relationship
61(12)
Affective Versus Intellectual Tuning In
63(2)
Tuning In to One's Own Feelings
65(1)
Different Levels of Tuning In
66(2)
Responding Directly to Indirect Cues
68(5)
Chapter Summary
73(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
73(1)
Beginnings and the Contracting Skills
74(37)
The Dynamics of New Relationships
76(5)
Contracting in First Sessions
81(5)
The Impact of Context on Practice
81(1)
Contracting Example
82(2)
Some Variant Elements in Contracting
84(2)
Research Findings on Contracting
86(1)
Contracting Over Time
86(2)
Contracting With Resistant Clients
88(11)
Models for Assessment in the Beginning Phase
99(3)
Culturally Diverse Practice Examples
102(7)
Working With Mexican Americans
103(1)
Working With African Americans
104(2)
Working With American Indians
106(1)
Working With Canadian Indians
107(1)
Issues in Cross-Racial Practice
107(2)
Education and Training for Culturally Sensitive Practice
109(1)
Chapter Summary
110(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
110(1)
Skills in the Work Phase
111(68)
A Model of the Work Phase Interview
112(1)
Work Phase Summary
113(3)
Preliminary Phase
113(1)
Beginning Phase
113(1)
Middle Phase
113(2)
Endings and Transitions
115(1)
Sessional Tuning-In Skills
116(6)
Tuning In to the Client's Sense of Urgency
116(2)
Tuning In to the Worker's Own Feelings
118(1)
Tuning In to the Meaning of the Client's Struggle
119(1)
Tuning In and the Worker's Realities of Time and Stress
120(1)
Tuning In to the Worker's Own Life Experiences
121(1)
Sessional Contracting Skills
122(3)
Working From the Client's Sense of Urgency
122(2)
Research on Sessional Contracting
124(1)
Impact of the Medical Paradigm on Sessional Contracting
124(1)
Elaborating Skills
125(7)
Containment
125(1)
Moving From the General to the Specific
126(1)
Focused Listening
127(1)
Questioning
128(1)
Reaching Inside of Silences
129(3)
Empathic Skills
132(7)
Reaching for Feelings
135(1)
Displaying Understanding of the Client's Feelings
136(1)
Putting the Client's Feelings Into Words
137(1)
Research on Empathy
138(1)
Sharing the Worker's Feelings
139(8)
Integrating the Personal and the Professional
139(1)
When the Worker Is Angry With the Client
140(2)
A Worker's Investment in the Success of the Client
142(1)
A Worker Sharing Feelings Associated With Life Experiences
143(1)
Boundary Issues in Sharing the Worker's Feelings
143(1)
Sexual Transference and Countertransference Feelings
144(1)
Research on Sharing Feelings
145(2)
Making a Demand for Work
147(7)
Partializing Client Concerns
150(2)
Holding to Focus
152(1)
Checking for Underlying Ambivalence
152(1)
Challenging the Illusion of Work
153(1)
Pointing Out Obstacles
154(7)
Supporting Clients in Taboo Areas
155(3)
Dealing With the Authority Theme
158(3)
Identifying Process and Content Connections
161(4)
Process and Content That Address the Authority Theme
161(1)
Impact of the Worker's Emotions
162(3)
Sharing Data
165(6)
Providing Relevant Data
166(2)
Providing Data in a Way That Is Open to Examination and Challenge
168(1)
Providing Data as a Personal View
169(1)
Ethical Dilemmas in Withholding Data
170(1)
Helping the Client See Life in New Ways
171(1)
Sessional Ending and Transition Skills
172(5)
Summarizing
173(1)
Generalizing
173(1)
Identifying the Next Steps
174(1)
Rehearsing
175(1)
Identifying ``Doorknob'' Communications
176(1)
Chapter Summary
177(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
178(1)
Endings and Transitions
179(32)
The Dynamics and Skills of Endings
181(10)
Flow of Affect in the Ending Phase
181(1)
Timing and the Ending Phase
182(1)
Stages of the Ending Phase
183(1)
Denial
183(2)
Indirect and Direct Expressions of Anger
185(2)
Mourning
187(3)
Trying It On for Size
190(1)
The Farewell-Party Syndrome
190(1)
The Skills of Transitions
191(9)
Identification of Major Learning
191(3)
Identification of Areas for Future Work
194(1)
Synthesizing the Ending Process and Content
195(1)
Transitions to New Experiences and Support Systems
196(4)
Variations on Endings
200(10)
Ending a Relationship That Never Really Began
200(2)
Endings Caused by the Termination of the Worker's Job
202(2)
Endings Caused by the Death of the Client
204(1)
Traumatic Events and Their Impact on a Worker's Practice
204(1)
Suicide on a Caseload
205(3)
Working With a Dying Client
208(2)
Chapter Summary
210(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
210(1)
PART III Social Work With Families
211(70)
The Preliminary and Beginning Phases in Family Practice
212(31)
What Constitutes a Family?
213(1)
Social Work With Families
214(2)
Family Support and Family Counseling
214(1)
Setting-Specific Work With Families
215(1)
The Unique Issues Associated With Family Dynamics
215(1)
Selected Concepts From Family Therapy Theory
216(5)
Psychodynamic
216(1)
Bowen Family Systems Theory
217(1)
Person-Centered
218(1)
Cognitive-Behavioral Family Therapy (CBFT)
219(1)
Multi-Systemic Model (MST)
219(1)
Core Concepts Across Theories
220(1)
The Preliminary Phase---Tuning In to the Family
221(1)
Agency Themes
221(1)
Authority Themes
221(1)
Family Work Themes
221(1)
The Two-Client Concept and the Worker's Role
222(3)
The Beginning Phase: Contracting With the Family
225(6)
The Problem-Oriented First Family Interview for the Beginner
225(2)
First Family Session With an Angry Father
227(1)
Description of the Curakis Family
227(1)
Precipitating Incident
227(1)
History
227(1)
The Interview
228(1)
Discussion of This First Family Session
229(2)
The Impact of Culture and Community
231(11)
Racism, Oppression, and the Native American Family
232(2)
A White Worker with a Native American Family
234(5)
Family Assessment Models
239(3)
Chapter Summary
242(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
242(1)
The Middle and Ending Phases in Family Practice
243(17)
The Middle Phase in Family Practice
243(1)
A Framework for Analyzing a Family Session
244(2)
The Work Phase Model
244(2)
Dealing With Family Secrets
246(2)
A Middle Phase Family Session
248(7)
The Record-of-Service Recording Device
248(7)
The Ending and Transition Phase
255(4)
Goals of the Ending/Transition Phase
255(1)
Emotional Reactions to the Ending Process in Family Counseling
256(1)
Ending the Sessions Before the Worker Believes They Are Finished
257(1)
The Impact of Ignoring Issues of Race, Class, and Culture
257(1)
Ending a Relationship Because of a Change in the Worker's Job Status
258(1)
Chapter Summary
259(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
259(1)
Variations in Family Practice
260(21)
The Impact of Setting and Service
261(1)
The Child Welfare Setting
262(11)
Work With Foster Parents
262(1)
Supporting the Foster Parent as She Supports the Foster Child
263(3)
Foster Parent Anger Over Erratic Visits With Biological Mother
266(2)
Work With Children in Residential Care
268(1)
Social Work Behind the Steering Wheel
268(3)
Work With Teen Parents and Their Families of Origin
271(1)
Children Raising Children: Work With a Teenage Parent
272(1)
Family Practice in the School Setting
273(5)
A High School Freshman With ADD
273(5)
Work With a Single-Parent Family
278(2)
Chapter Summary
280(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
280(1)
PART IV Social Work With Groups
281(244)
The Preliminary Phase in Group Practice: The Group as a Mutual-Aid System
282(37)
The ``Fear-of-Groups'' Syndrome
284(2)
The Dynamics of Mutual Aid
286(9)
Sharing Data
286(1)
The Dialectical Process
287(1)
Discussing a Taboo Area
288(1)
The ``All-in-the-Same-Boat'' Phenomenon
288(1)
Developing a Universal Perspective
289(1)
Mutual Support
290(1)
Mutual Demand
291(1)
Individual Problem-Solving
292(1)
Rehearsal
292(2)
The ``Strength-in-Numbers'' Phenomenon
294(1)
Obstacles to Mutual Aid
295(1)
The Function of the Group Leader
296(1)
Group Formation
297(11)
Preparing for Group Work
297(1)
Work With the Staff System
298(1)
Achieving Consensus on the Service
299(5)
Identifying Group Type and Structure
304(2)
Group Versus Individual Work With Clients
306(1)
Agency or Setting Support for Groups
307(1)
Group Composition, Timing, and Structure
308(6)
Group Member Selection
309(2)
Group Timing
311(2)
Group Structure, Setting, and Rules
313(1)
Work With Prospective Members
314(4)
Worker Skills in the Initial Interviews
315(3)
Chapter Summary
318(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
318(1)
The Beginning Phase in the Group
319(60)
The Dynamics of First Group Sessions
320(1)
The Couples' Group: An Illustration
321(18)
The Initial Work
322(9)
The Work Continues
331(6)
Ending and Transition
337(2)
Variations on First Group Sessions
339(17)
Working With Children and Adolescents
339(1)
Foster Adolescents in a Child Welfare Setting
340(1)
Setting Limits: An Adolescent Acting-Out Boys' Group
340(3)
Impact of Authority: Involuntary Groups
343(1)
Stages-of-Change Model
344(1)
Male Batterers
345(1)
Driving While Intoxicated (DWI)
346(2)
Working With Specific Client Problems
348(1)
Parents of Children With Cerebral Palsy
348(1)
Women With Multiple Sclerosis (MS): Crying in the First Session
349(1)
Impact of the Setting
350(1)
Patient Ward Group in a Hospital
351(1)
Impact of Time
352(1)
Short-Term Group for Single Parents in a Rural Setting
352(4)
Recontracting
356(7)
Recontracting With One's Own Group
357(1)
A Group in a Shelter for Battered Women
357(6)
Coleadership in Groups---Contracting on Purpose
363(8)
A Coleadership Conflict Example: The Social Work Intern and the Substance Abuse Counselor in a Dual-Diagnosis Group
365(6)
The Open-Ended Group
371(3)
Hospital Group on a Gynecological Ward
372(1)
Bringing a New Member Into an AIDS Group
373(1)
The Single-Session Group
374(3)
Information Group: Foster Parent Recruitment
375(1)
Informal Event Group: Remembering the Holocaust
376(1)
Chapter Summary
377(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
378(1)
The Work Phase in the Group
379(42)
The False Dichotomy Between the Individual and the Group
380(1)
Sessional Contracting in the Group
380(12)
Reaching for an Individual's Communication in the Group
381(1)
Illustration from the 19th Session of the Married Couples Group
382(3)
The Lost and Found Group: Children Grieving the Loss of a Family Member
385(1)
Friends, Lovers, and Relatives: Grieving the Loss of a Person With AIDS
386(1)
Open-Ended Group in a VA Hospital on the Anniversary of 9/11
387(1)
Reaching for the Group Response to the Individual
388(1)
Day Treatment Group for Persons With Chronic Mental Illness
388(1)
Reaching for the Work When Obstacles Threaten
389(1)
Teenager in a Residential Center, Raising a Difficult Subject
390(1)
Mothers of Children Diagnosed with Hyperactivity
391(1)
Mothers of Sixth-Grade Boys Who Underachieve in School
392(1)
The Work Phase in a Group Session
392(10)
Helping the Group Work Over Time
393(1)
Puerto Rican Pregnant Teens
393(6)
Focusing the Group on Problem-Solving Mutual Aid
399(1)
Adult Group Dealing With Separation and Depression
399(3)
Sessional Endings and Transitions
402(2)
Mothers of Children Diagnosed as Hyperactive
402(2)
Activity Groups
404(15)
The Functions of Shared Activity in Mutual Aid Groups
404(1)
Two Categories of Activity Groups
405(1)
Children Dealing With Their Parents' Separation and Divorce
406(11)
Vietnamese Immigrant Women
417(2)
Chapter Summary
419(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
419(2)
Working With the Individual and the Group
421(79)
The Concept of Role in a Dynamic System
422(2)
The Impact of Oppression on Social Role
422(1)
Formal and Informal Roles in the Group
423(1)
The Scapegoat
424(8)
A Scapegoating Example
425(1)
African American and Hispanic Teenage Girls in a School
425(7)
Dealing With the Scapegoating Pattern
432(1)
The ``Deviant'' Member
432(5)
Extreme Versus Mild Deviance
433(1)
Foster Parent Recruitment Group Example
433(1)
Foster Parent Support Group
434(1)
Reaching for the Underlying Message of Deviant Behavior
434(1)
Group for Children Having Trouble in School
434(1)
Deviant Behavior as a Functional Role
435(1)
Counseling Group at a Psychiatric Hospital
435(1)
Opening a Discussion of the Group's Functioning
435(1)
Deepening Discussion in a Parenting Group
436(1)
The Internal Leader
437(3)
Dealing With Acting-Out Adolescents: A Community Center Group
437(3)
The Gatekeeper
440(2)
The Defensive Member
442(9)
A Defensive Father in a Parents' Group
442(2)
Denial in a Living-With-Cancer Group
444(7)
The Quiet Member
451(2)
Worker Strategies
451(1)
The Member Who Is Afraid to Speak
452(1)
The Member Who Feels Left Out
452(1)
The Monopolizer
453(2)
The Group as an Organism
455(2)
Developmental Tasks for the Group
457(13)
Dealing With the Relationship to the Leader
458(1)
Who Owns the Group? Issues of Control
458(1)
The Couples' Group and the Authority Theme
458(2)
The Group Leader as the Outsider
460(1)
Parents of Hyperactive Children and the Authority Theme
460(1)
The Group Leader's Demand for Work
461(1)
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Vietnam Veterans Group
461(7)
The Group Leader's Limitations
468(1)
The Group Leader as a Caring and Giving Person
469(1)
Dealing With the Relationships Among Members
470(28)
College Student Counseling Group and the Intimacy Theme
471(2)
Intimacy and the Relational Model
473(1)
Paradox
474(1)
Connection
474(1)
Resonance
475(1)
A Support Group for Women With Cancer
475(6)
Developing a Culture for Work
481(1)
Parents of Hyperactive Children: Accepting Difficult Feelings
482(4)
Married Couples: Legitimizing the Expression of Anger
486(1)
Married Couples: Dealing With Sexual Taboos
487(1)
White Workers With African American Inner-City High School Girls: From ``Anger Management'' to Mutual Aid Support
488(7)
Residential Center for Young Men in the Criminal Justice System
495(1)
Developing a Structure for Work
496(1)
An Outpatient Group for Young Recovering Addicts
496(2)
Chapter Summary
498(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
498(2)
Endings and Transitions With Groups
500(25)
Ending and Transition Phase in Groups
501(3)
Denial
501(1)
Anger
501(1)
Mourning
502(1)
Trying It on for Size
502(1)
Farewell-Party Syndrome
503(1)
Worker Strategies With Regard to Ending
503(1)
Worker Strategies With Regard to Transition
504(1)
Group Illustrations
504(19)
Patients With Multiple Sclerosis
505(2)
Children's Group in an Elementary School
507(2)
Male Batterers' Group
509(2)
Female Worker's Last Session With Men in a Correctional Setting
511(1)
Adult Female Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse: Endings Over Time
512(7)
A Termination Session: The Worker Leaving the Group in a Residential Setting
519(4)
Chapter Summary
523(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
524(1)
PART V Macro Social Work Practice: Impacting the Agency/Setting and the Community, and Effecting Social Change
525(94)
Professional Impact and Helping Clients Negotiate the System
526(47)
Macro-Practice
527(2)
A Social Systems Approach
527(2)
The Individual-System Interaction
529(1)
Mediating the Individual-System Engagement
530(24)
Native Worker and a White Teacher
531(2)
Work With the School System When a Student is Suspended
533(6)
Family Court Group for Parents of Truant Children: Race, Class, and Conflict With Teachers in a School
539(5)
Work With a Psychiatrist in a Hospital Setting
544(5)
Confrontation, Social Pressure, and Advocacy
549(1)
Finding Housing for an Overwhelmed Client: A Canadian Example
550(4)
Professional Impact on the System
554(3)
Factors That Make Professional Impact Difficult
556(1)
System Resistance and the Pre-Contemplation Stage
556(1)
Fear of Retribution
556(1)
Stereotyped Views of Administration
557(1)
From Individual Problems to Social Action
557(4)
Illustrations of Agency Change
558(1)
Hospital Emergency Room Service
558(2)
Rehabilitation Institution for Paraplegics
560(1)
Sexuality in a Home for the Aged
561(1)
Professional Impact and Interstaff Relationships
561(8)
The Agency as a Social System
562(1)
Problems Associated With ``Process-Focused'' Staff Meetings
563(1)
Dealing With Process in Relation to a Problem or Issue
563(1)
Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Work With a Client
564(1)
Interdepartmental Communications in a Large System
565(4)
Impact on Relations With Staff at Other Agencies
569(3)
Emergency Services Workers in Conflict With Hospital Staff
569(2)
The ``Too Many Cooks'' Problem
571(1)
Externalizing the Problem: It's Always the Other Person's Fault
571(1)
Chapter Summary
572(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
572(1)
Social Work Practice in the Community---Philosophy, Models, and Principles
573(11)
The Development of Community Social Work Practice
574(1)
Empowerment-Oriented and Progressive Practice Models
574(1)
Principles of Effective Community Organizing
575(1)
Community Organizing Philosophy and Models
576(5)
Grassroots Community Organizing
577(1)
Community Organizing Around a Specific Issue
578(1)
Rural-Based Community Organization Practice
579(1)
The Use of the Internet in Community Practice
580(1)
The Neighborhood as Community
581(1)
The Role of the Worker in the Community
582(1)
Chapter Summary
583(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
583(1)
Community Organization and Social Action Practice
584(35)
The Phases of Work in Community Organizing Practice
585(28)
The Preliminary and Beginning Phase of Community Practice
585(1)
Contracting: A Tenants' Group in Public Housing
585(3)
The SNCC: Starting Where the Client (Community) Is
588(1)
The Middle or Work Phase of Practice
588(1)
Structure and Maintenance: A Citizen's Antipoverty Action Group
588(3)
The Deviant Member: Community-Based Citizens' Advisory Board
591(1)
Mothers on Welfare in Public Housing: Negotiating the Environment
592(10)
Mobilizing Adolescent Peer Leaders in the Community
602(5)
The Ending/Transition Phase of Practice: The Milieu as Community
607(1)
Patient Empowerment Through a Newspaper in a VA Hospital
607(6)
Social Workers and Social Action
613(4)
Social Action in the Community
614(3)
Advocacy Groups and Political Activity
617(1)
Chapter Summary
617(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
618(1)
PART VI Practice Models, Evidence-Based Practice, Agency Policies, Ethics, Legislation, and the Courts
619(60)
Additional Social Work Perspectives and Evidence-Based Practice
620(35)
Solution-Focused Practice
621(2)
Major Assumptions on the Nature of the Helping Relationship
621(1)
Defining Techniques
622(1)
Radical Social Work Practice
623(1)
Feminist Practice
624(3)
Historical Roots
624(1)
Feminist Practice Typology
624(1)
``Take Back the Night'' March: An Example
625(1)
The New Psychology of Women
626(1)
Feminist Group Work
627(1)
Social Work as Psychotherapy
627(1)
Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
627(4)
Some Cautions Related to Models From Other Disciplines
629(2)
Evolving Models of Practice
631(14)
Religion and Spirituality
631(1)
Definitions
632(1)
Interventions: The Spiritual/Religious Autobiography
633(1)
Practice in Response to Trauma and Extreme Events
634(1)
Crisis Theory and Crisis Intervention
635(1)
Crisis Intervention Stress Management
636(1)
Trauma Groups
637(1)
Forgiveness Exercises
638(1)
Impact of Disaster on the Professional
639(1)
Working With Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgender Clients
639(1)
Definitions
640(1)
The Oppression Perspective
640(2)
The Strengths Perspective for LGBT Clients
642(1)
Strategies for LGBT Sensitive Practice: The School Social Worker Example
642(2)
Summary of Other Models and Evolving Models of Practice
644(1)
Evidence-Based Practice
645(3)
An Illustration: Motivational Interviewing
647(1)
Evaluation of Practice: Process and Outcomes
648(6)
Process Evaluation: The Record of Service
649(2)
Outcome Evaluation: The Single-System Research Design
651(1)
The Scientist-Practitioner Model
652(2)
Chapter Summary
654(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
654(1)
The Impact of the Agency Culture, Ethics, Legislation, and Evaluation
655(24)
The Agency Culture
656(2)
Values and Ethics in Social Work Practice
658(9)
Definitions of Values and Ethics
658(1)
National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics
659(1)
Historical Context
659(2)
Ethical Problems and Dilemmas
661(1)
Factors That Affect Ethical Decision-Making
662(2)
Values and Ethics in the Professional Literature
664(1)
Guidelines for Practice in Family and Group Work
664(3)
Social Changes and Their Impact on Ethical Practice
667(3)
Managed Care
667(2)
End-of-Life Decisions
669(1)
The Impact of Legislation and the Court
670(6)
Licensing and the Social Work Profession
671(1)
Confidentiality and Privileged Communications
671(3)
Informed Consent
674(1)
The Duty to Warn
675(1)
Chapter Summary
676(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
677(2)
Glossary 679(10)
References 689(8)
Index of Case Examples 697(4)
Name Index 701(3)
Subject Index 704
Kampanje!
Du vil kanskje også like:
Allianser - Odd Arne Tjersland Pocket
Odd Arne Tjersland
Allianser
Vår pris: 425,-
Mellom makt og hjelp - Greta Marie Skau Pocket
Greta Marie Skau
Mellom makt og hjelp
Vår pris: 329,-
Dokument i klientarbeid - Gurid Aga Askeland Pocket
Gurid Aga Askeland
Dokument i klientarbe..
Vår pris: 304,-
Spar: 45,-