Ultrafast Supercontinuum Generation in Transparent Solid-State Media

; Arnaud Couairon

This book presents the underlying physical picture and an overview of the state of the art of femtosecond supercontinuum generation in various transparent solid-state media, ranging from wide-bandgap dielectrics to semiconductor materials, and across various parts of the optical spectrum, from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared. Les mer
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Vår pris: 759,-

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På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Om boka

This book presents the underlying physical picture and an overview of the state of the art of femtosecond supercontinuum generation in various transparent solid-state media, ranging from wide-bandgap dielectrics to semiconductor materials, and across various parts of the optical spectrum, from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared. A particular emphasis is placed on the most recent experimental developments: multioctave supercontinuum generation with pumping in the mid-infrared spectral range, spectral control, power and energy scaling of broadband radiation and the development of simple, flexible and robust pulse compression techniques, which deliver few optical cycle pulses and which could be readily implemented in a variety of modern ultrafast laser systems. The expected audience includes graduate students, professionals and scientists working in the field of laser-matter interactions and ultrafast nonlinear optics.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Preface

Introduction

Part I. Physical picture of supercontinuum generation

Chapter 1. Governing physical effects

1.1. Self-focusing of laser beams

1.2. Self-phase modulation of laser pulses

1.3. Nonlinear absorption and ionization

1.4. Plasma effects

1.4.1. Transition of electrons from the valence to the conduction band

1.4.2. Refractive index change

1.4.3. Plasma induced phase modulation

1.4.4. The Drude-Lorentz model

1.5. Intensity clamping

1.6. Chromatic dispersion

1.7. Self-steepening and space-time focusing

1.8. Four wave mixing and phase matching

1.9. Conical emission

Chapter 2. Femtosecond filamentation in solid state media

2.1. Universal features

2.2. Numerical model

2.3. Supercontinuum generation under normal GVD

2.4. Supercontinuum generation under anomalous GVD

2.5. Supercontinuum generation under near zero GVD

2.6. Comparison with supercontinuum generation in a fiber

Part 2. Overview of the experimental results

Chapter 3. General practical considerations

3.1. Materials

3.2. Numerical aperture

3.3. Stability issues

3.4. Focusing-defocusing cycles

3.5. Multiple filamentation

Chapter 4. Experimental results

4.1. Water as prototypical nonlinear medium

4.2. Glasses

4.3. Alkali metal fluorides

4.4. Laser hosts

4.5. Crystals possessing second-order nonlinearity

4.6. Semiconductors

4.7. Other nonlinear media

Chapter 5. New developments

5.1. Power and energy scaling

5.2. Pulse compression

5.3. Supercontinuum generation with picosecond laser pulses

5.4. Supercontinuum generation with non-Gaussian beams

5.5. Control of supercontinuum generation



References

Om forfatteren

Audrius Dubietis graduated from Vilnius University in 1989, and was awarded a PhD in 1996. He has been professor in the Department of Quantum Electronics, Laser Research Center, Vilnius University, since 2006. His areas of research areas include nonlinear optics, laser physics, atmospheric phenomena, physics, optics, and astronomy. In 1992, together with G. Jonusauskas and A. Piskarskas, he proposed a method of parametric amplification of phase-modulated light pulses, which is implemented by the most important ultra-powerful laser centers worldwide. He has published more than 90 scientific articles in the peer-reviewed literature.

Arnaud Couairon is a research director at the CNRS. He studied at Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris