Boone Before Boone

The Archaeological Record of Northwestern North Carolina Through 1769

Native Americans have occupied the mountains of northwestern North Carolina for around 14,000 years. This book tells the story of their lives, adaptations, responses to climate change, and ultimately, the devastation brought on by encounters with Europeans. Les mer
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Vår pris: 434,-

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Er du interessert i historiebøker ?
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Om boka

Native Americans have occupied the mountains of northwestern North Carolina for around 14,000 years. This book tells the story of their lives, adaptations, responses to climate change, and ultimately, the devastation brought on by encounters with Europeans. After a brief introduction to archaeology, the book covers each time period, chapter by chapter, beginning with the Paleoindian period in the Ice Age and ending with the arrival of Daniel Boone in 1769, with descriptions and interpretations of archaeological evidence for each time period. Each chapter begins with a fictional vignette to kindle the reader's imaginings of ancient human life in the mountains, and includes descriptions and numerous images of sites and artifacts discovered in Boone, North Carolina and the surrounding region.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Acknowledgments
Preface
Introduction
1. Paleoindian Period: 11,500-9,500 bce
2. Early Archaic Period: 8,000-6,000 bce
3. Middle Archaic Period: 6,000-3,000 bce
4. Late Archaic Period: 3,000 to 1,000 bce
5. Early Woodland Period: 1,000 bce-200 ce
6. Middle Woodland Period: 200-900 ce
7. Late Woodland Period: 900-1400 ce
8. Contact: Late May 1540 ce
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index

Om forfatteren

Tom Whyte is a professor in the anthropology department at Appalachian State University. For over 40 years he has been doing archaeology research in the Appalachian Mountains and has published more than fifty articles and written more than sixty technical reports on his investigations. He lives in Sugar Grove, just west of Boone, North Carolina.