Ruined Skylines

Aesthetics, Politics and London's Towering Cityscape

This book examines the skyline as a space for radical urban politics. Focusing on the relationship between aesthetics and politics in London's tall-building boom, it develops a critique of the construction of more and more speculative towers as well as a critique of the claim that these buildings ruin the historic cityscape. Les mer
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Legg i
Vår pris: 499,-

(Paperback) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 7 virkedager

Om boka

This book examines the skyline as a space for radical urban politics. Focusing on the relationship between aesthetics and politics in London's tall-building boom, it develops a critique of the construction of more and more speculative towers as well as a critique of the claim that these buildings ruin the historic cityscape. Gassner argues that the new London skyline needs to be ruined instead and explores ruination as a political appropriation of the commodified and financialised cityscape. Aimed at academics and students in the fields of architecture, urban design, politics, urban geography, and sociology, Ruined Skylines engages with the work of Walter Benjamin and other critical and political theorists. It examines accounts of sometimes rebellious and often conservative groupings, including the City Beautiful movement, the English Townscape movement, and the Royal Fine Art Commission, and discusses tower developments in the City of London - 110 Bishopsgate, the Pinnacle, 22 Bishopsgate, 1 Undershaft, 122 Leadenhall, and 20 Fenchurch - in order to make a case for reanimating urban politics as an art of the possible.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

List of figures


Acknowledgments


The new London skyline











Conservative representations



A tall-building boom


Conservatism


Ruination


Outline of the book









Visual and political representativeness



The notion of the skyline


Form, power, finance, function


Political skylines


Agency









Composition



Western views


Compositional wholeness


Townscape


Image


Wholeness









Sequence



Skyline profiles and sky gaps


Linear sequence


Occupying the line


Optical space









Aesthetic and speculative value



Reframing building height


Aestheticising and beautifying


The skyline as a monad


Open totality









History



Enshrinement as heritage


History as a process


Inward history


Historical progress


The orderly city









Meaning



Linear and painterly


Religion as capitalism


Allegories and symbols


Baroque folding


Resistance









Political images



Ruination


Conservatism


A tall-building boom




Index

Om forfatteren

Gunter Gassner is Lecturer in Urban Design at the School of Geography and Planning, Cardiff University, Wales, and an architect. His research and teaching interests lie at the intersection of critical theory and spatial practices. He specialises in questions about relationships between aesthetics and politics, history and power, and urban visions and visualisations.