Phenotypic Plasticity & Evolution

Causes, Consequences, Controversies

David W. Pfennig (Redaktør)

Phenotypic plasticity - the ability of an individual organism to alter its features in direct response to a change in its environment - is ubiquitous. Understanding how and why this phenomenon exists is crucial because it unites all levels of biological inquiry. Les mer
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Legg i
Vår pris: 2869,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

Om boka

Phenotypic plasticity - the ability of an individual organism to alter its features in direct response to a change in its environment - is ubiquitous. Understanding how and why this phenomenon exists is crucial because it unites all levels of biological inquiry. This book brings together researchers who approach plasticity from diverse perspectives to explore new ideas and recent findings about the causes and consequences of plasticity. Contributors also discuss such controversial topics as how plasticity shapes ecological and evolutionary processes; whether specific plastic responses can be passed to offspring; and whether plasticity has left an important imprint on the history of life. Importantly, each chapter highlights key questions for future research. Drawing on numerous studies of plasticity in natural populations of plants and animals, this book aims to foster greater appreciation for this important, but frequently misunderstood phenomenon.





Key Features








Written in an accessible style with numerous illustrations, including many in color







Reviews the history of the study of plasticity, including Darwin's views







Most chapters conclude with recommendations for future research

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Foreword: A Perspective on Plasticity
Mary Jane West-Eberhard





Preface and Acknowledgements


David W. Pfennig








Section I Plasticity & Evolution: Concepts & Questions


Phenotypic Plasticity as an Intrinsic Property of Organisms


Sonia E. Sultan

"There is Hardly Any Question in Biology of More Importance"--Charles Darwin and the Nature of Variation


James T. Costa





Key Questions about Phenotypic Plasticity


David W. Pfennig





Section II Causes of Plasticity: From Genes to Ecology


Genetic Variation in Phenotypic Plasticity


Ilan Goldstein & Ian M. Ehrenreich





Physiological Mechanisms and the Evolution of Plasticity


Cristina C. Ledon-Rettig & Erik J. Ragsdale





Ecology and the Evolution of Plasticity


Emilie Snell-Rood & Sean Ehlman





The Loss of Phenotypic Plasticity via Natural Selection: Genetic Assimilation


Samuel M. Scheiner & Nicholas A. Levis





Section III Consequences of Plasticity: Adaptation, Origination, Diversification





Buying Time: Plasticity and Population Persistence


Sarah E. Diamond & Ryan A. Martin





Innovation and Diversification via Plasticity-led Evolution


Nicholas A. Levis & David W. Pfennig





Plasticity and Evolutionary Transitions in Individuality


Dinah R. Davison & Richard E. Michod





Phenotypic Plasticity in the Fossil Record


Adrian M. Lister





Section IV Plasticity & Evolution: Controversies & Consensus


The Special Case of Behavioral Plasticity?


Kathryn Chenard & Renee A. Duckworth





Plasticity Across Generations


Russell Bonduriansky





How Does Phenotypic Plasticity Fit into Evolutionary Theory?


Douglas J. Futuyma





Plasticity and Evolutionary Theory: Where We Are and Where We Should be Going


Carl D. Schlichting





List of Contributors


Index

Om forfatteren

David W. Pfennig is a professor of biology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and a Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer. He is broadly interested in evolutionary biology, ecology, behavior, and developmental biology and is author (with Karin Pfennig) of Evolution's Wedge: Competition and the Origins of Diversity. His work has been featured on The National Geographic Channel, on the BBC/ PBS's Nature series, and in The New York Times, Newsweek, National Geographic, Scientific American, New Scientist, and Discover, among other publications.