Three-Dimensional Electron Microscopy

Thomas Muller-Reichert (Redaktør) ; Gaia Pigino (Redaktør)

Three-Dimensional Electron Microscopy, Volume 152 in the Methods in Cell Biology series, highlights new advances in the field, with this new volume presenting interesting chapters focusing on FIB-SEM of mouse nervous tissue: fast and slow sample preparation, Serial-section electron microscopy using ATUM - Automated Tape collecting Ultra-Microtome, Software for automated acquisition of electron tomography tilt series, Scanning electron tomography of biological samples embedded in plastic, Cryo-STEM tomography for Biology, CryoCARE: Content-aware denoising of cryo-EM images and tomograms using artificial neural networks, Expedited large-volume 3-D SEM workflows for comparative vertebrate microanatomical imaging, and many other interesting topics. Les mer
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Vår pris: 2346,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

Om boka

Three-Dimensional Electron Microscopy, Volume 152 in the Methods in Cell Biology series, highlights new advances in the field, with this new volume presenting interesting chapters focusing on FIB-SEM of mouse nervous tissue: fast and slow sample preparation, Serial-section electron microscopy using ATUM - Automated Tape collecting Ultra-Microtome, Software for automated acquisition of electron tomography tilt series, Scanning electron tomography of biological samples embedded in plastic, Cryo-STEM tomography for Biology, CryoCARE: Content-aware denoising of cryo-EM images and tomograms using artificial neural networks, Expedited large-volume 3-D SEM workflows for comparative vertebrate microanatomical imaging, and many other interesting topics.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

1. FIB-SEM of mouse nervous tissue: Fast and slow sample preparation Anna M. Steyer, Andreas Schertel, Christos Nardis and Wiebke Möbius 2. Expedited large-volume 3-D SEM workflows for comparative microanatomical imaging Gerald John Shami, Delfine Cheng and Filip Braet 3. Serial-section electron microscopy using automated tape-collecting ultramicrotome (ATUM) Valentina Baena, Richard Lee Schalek, Jeff William Lichtman and Mark Terasaki 4. Serial block face-scanning electron microscopy for volume electron microscopy Saskia Lippens, Anna Kremer, Peter Borghgraef and Chris Guérin 5. Combining serial block face and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy for 3D studies of rare events Christopher J. Guérin, Anna Kremer, Peter Borghgraef, Andy Y. Shih and Saskia Lippens 6. Yeast membraneless compartments revealed by correlative light microscopy and electron tomography Guendalina Marini and Gaia Pigino 7. In situ analysis of male meiosis in C. elegans Gunar Fabig, Anna Schwarz, Cynthia Striese, Michael Laue and Thomas Müller-Reichert 8. Software for automated acquisition of electron tomography tilt series Guenter P. Resch 9. In situ cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging of intraflagellar transport trains Mareike Jordan and Gaia Pigino 10. CryoSTEM tomography in biology Sharon G. Wolf and Michael Elbaum 11. Subtomogram averaging from cryo-electron tomograms Kendra E. Leigh, Paula P. Navarro, Stefano Scaramuzza, Wenbo Chen, Yingyi Zhang, Daniel Castaño-Díez and Misha Kudryashev 12. Computational methods for stitching, alignment, and artifact correction of serial section data Stephan Saalfeld 13. Content-aware image restoration for electron microscopy Tim-Oliver Buchholz, Alexander Krull, Réza Shahidi, Gaia Pigino, Gáspár Jékely and Florian Jug

Om forfatteren

Thomas Müller-Reichert is a Professor of Structural Cell Biology at the Technische Universität Dresden (TU Dresden, Germany). He is interested in how the microtubule cytoskeleton is modulated within cells to fulfill functions in mitosis, meiosis and abscission. The Müller-Reichert lab is mainly applying correlative light microscopy and electron tomography to study the 3D organization of microtubules in early embryos and meiocytes of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and also in mammalian cells in culture. He has published over 75 papers and edited several volumes of the Methods in Cell Biology series on electron microscopy and CLEM.

TMR obtained his PhD at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich and moved afterwards for a post-doc to the EMBL in Heidelberg (Germany). He was a visiting scientist with Dr. Kent McDonald (UC Berkeley, USA). Together with Paul Verkade, he set up the electron microscope facility at the newly founded Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG). Since 2010 he is a scientific group leader and head of the Core Facility Cellular Imaging (CFCI) of the Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus of the TU Dresden. He acted as president of the German Society for Electron Microscopy (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Elektronenmikroskopie, DGE) from 2018 to 2019.
He taught numerous courses and workshops on high-pressure freezing and Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy. Dr. Pigino works at Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany