Social Monitoring for Public Health

; Mark Dredze ; Gary Marchionini

Public health thrives on high-quality evidence, yet acquiring meaningful data on a population remains a central challenge of public health research and practice. Social monitoring, the analysis of social media and other user-generated web data, has brought advances in the way we leverage population data to understand health. Les mer
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Paperback
Legg i
Vår pris: 1029,-

(Paperback) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

Om boka

Public health thrives on high-quality evidence, yet acquiring meaningful data on a population remains a central challenge of public health research and practice. Social monitoring, the analysis of social media and other user-generated web data, has brought advances in the way we leverage population data to understand health. Social media offers advantages over traditional data sources, including real-time data availability, ease of access, and reduced cost. Social media allows us to ask, and answer, questions we never thought possible.

This book presents an overview of the progress on uses of social monitoring to study public health over the past decade. We explain available data sources, common methods, and survey research on social monitoring in a wide range of public health areas. Our examples come from topics such as disease surveillance, behavioral medicine, and mental health, among others. We explore the limitations and concerns of these methods. Our survey of this exciting new field of data-driven research lays out future research directions.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Preface
Acknowledgments
A New Source of Big Data
Public Health: A Primer
Social Data
Methods of Monitoring
Public Health Applications
Limitations and Concerns
Looking Ahead
Bibliography
Authors' Biographies

Om forfatteren

Michael J. Paul is an assistant professor in Information Science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He develops data science techniques for analyzing and organizing large text datasets, used for applications in health science and computational epidemiology. His work was among the first to identify the broad set of health issues that can be studied in Twitter, and his research has advanced the state of the art in influenza surveillance on multiple occasions. He is a former Twitter intern, and his work with Mark Dredze was featured in a video as part of the Twitter Stories series. He obtained his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Johns Hopkins University in 2015. Mark Dredze is an associate professor in Computer Science at Johns Hopkins University. He is affiliated with the Center for Language and Speech Processing, the Human Language Technology Center of Excellence, and the Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare. His work focuses on developing machine learning models for natural language processing (NLP) applications. He has pioneered new applications of these technologies in public health informatics, including work with social media data, biomedical articles, and clinical texts. His work is regularly covered by major media outlets, including NPR, The New York Times, and CNN. He obtained his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Pennsylvania in 2009. Gary Marchionini is the Cary C. Boshamer Professor of Information Science in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His Ph.D. is from Wayne State University in mathematics education with an emphasis on educational computing. His research interests are in information seeking in electronic environments, digital libraries, human-computer interaction, digital government and information technology policy. He has had grants or contracts from the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, the Council on Library Resources, the National Library of Medicine, the Library of Congress, the Kellogg Foundation, and NASA, among others. He was the Conference Chair for the 1996 ACM Digital Library Conference and program chair for the 2002 ACM-IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries. He is editor-in-chief for ACM Transactions on Information Systems and serves on the editorial boards of a dozen scholarly journals. He has published more than 150 articles, chapters, and conference papers in the information science, computer science, and education literatures. He founded the Interaction Design Laboratory at UNC-CH.