sendmail

; Claus Assmann ; George Jansen ; Gregory Neil Shapiro

A classic O'Reilly title since 1993, "Sendmail" now covers Versions 8.10 through 8.14 of this email routing program, including dozens of new features, options, and macros. This edition also takes a more nuts-and-bolts approach than its predecessors. Les mer
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Om boka

A classic O'Reilly title since 1993, "Sendmail" now covers Versions 8.10 through 8.14 of this email routing program, including dozens of new features, options, and macros. This edition also takes a more nuts-and-bolts approach than its predecessors. It includes both an administration handbook and a reference guide that provide you with clear options for installing, configuring and managing sendmail's latest versions and companion programs. The sendmail program has withstood the test of time because of its ability to solve the mail-routing needs of all sites large or small, complex or simple. But it's also difficult to configure and even more difficult to understand. That's why this book has proven valuable since the dawn of email. With it, you will be able to configure the program to meet any need, so that you never again have to call in a sendmail guru to bail you out."
Sendmail" includes the following sections: Some Basics is especially useful for people new to the program, it covers the basic concepts underlying mail delivery and the roles sendmail plays in that delivery; Administration covers all aspects of handling sendmail, from downloading and installing new releases to managing mailing lists and aliases; Configuration Reference contains a heavily cross-referenced guide for configuring and tuning sendmail, every arcane detail of sendmail is listed alphabetically; and, Appendices contain more detail about sendmail than you may ever need.This edition also includes new material on SSL and AUTH and a new chapter on Mitlers. If you're interested in what has changed since the last edition, one appendix categorizes the many improvements of sendmail's intervening versions by chapter, complete with references to the appropriate sections and page numbers in the book. With "Sendmail", system administrators, programmers, network engineers, and even inexperienced users will be able to match this challenging but necessary utility to the needs of their network.

Fakta

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Prefacexv




Some Basics

1(40)




Email Basics

1(1)




Requests for Comments (RFCs)

2(1)




Email and sendmail

2(2)




Basic Parts of sendmail

4(1)




Basic Parts of a Mail Message

5(5)




Basic Roles of sendmail

10(8)




Basic Modes of sendmail

18(11)




The sendmail.cf File

29(12)




Part I. Administration





Download, Build, and Install

41(62)




Vendor Versus Compiling

41(1)




Download the Source

42(3)




What's Where in the Source

45(8)




Build sendmail

53(7)




Install sendmail

60(9)




Pitfalls

69(1)




Build m4 Macro Reference

69(34)




Tune sendmail with Compile-Time Macros

103(51)




Before You Begin, a Checklist

103(2)




To Port, Tune, or Debug

105(3)




Pitfalls

108(1)




Compile-Time Macro Reference

108(46)




Maintain Security with sendmail

154(29)




Why root?

154(2)




The Environment

156(1)




SMTP Probes

157(3)




The Configuration File

160(4)




Permissions

164(5)




The aliases File

169(1)




Forged Mail

170(3)




Security Features

173(8)




Other Security Information

181(1)




Pitfalls

182(1)




Authentication and Encryption

183(37)




Support SMTP AUTH

183(16)




Public Key Cryptography

199(3)




Starttls

202(17)




Pitfalls

219(1)




The sendmail Command Line

220(31)




Alternative argv[0] Names

220(3)




Command-Line Switches

223(3)




List of Recipient Addresses

226(1)




Processing the Command Line

226(2)




sendmail's exit() Status

228(2)




Pitfalls

230(1)




Alphabetized Command-Line Switches

231(20)




How to Handle Spam

251(48)




The Local_check_ Rule Sets

252(8)




How DNSBL Works

260(5)




Check Headers with Rule Sets

265(2)




Relaying

267(10)




The access Database

277(13)




Spam Suppression Features

290(7)




Pitfalls

297(2)




Test Rule Sets with -bt

299(22)




Overview

299(2)




Configuration Lines

301(3)




Dump a sendmail Macro or Class

304(1)




Show an Item

305(2)




Complex Actions Made Simple

307(7)




Process-Specified Addresses

314(4)




Add Debugging for Detail

318(1)




Batch Rule-Set Testing

319(1)




Pitfalls

320(1)




DNS and sendmail

321(25)




Overview

321(4)




How sendmail Uses DNS

325(7)




Set Up MX Records

332(6)




How to Use dig

338(5)




Pitfalls

343(3)




Build and Use Companion Programs

346(48)




The Build Script

346(8)




The editmap Program

354(5)




The mail.local Delivery Agent

359(5)




The mailstats Program

364(6)




The makemap Program

370(6)




The praliases Program

376(2)




The rmail Delivery Agent

378(1)




The smrsh Program

379(3)




The vacation Program

382(11)




Pitfalls

393(1)




Manage the Queue

394(66)




Overview of the Queue

394(2)




Parts of a Queued Message

396(5)




Using Multiple Queue Directories

401(7)




Queue Groups (V8.12 and Later)

408(11)




Bogus qf Files

419(3)




Printing the Queue

422(4)




How the Queue Is Processed

426(1)




Cause Queues to Be Processed

427(9)




Process Alternative Queues

436(2)




Queue Quarantining

438(6)




Pitfalls

444(1)




The qf File Internals

445(15)




Maintain Aliases

460(25)




The aliases(5) File

460(5)




Forms of Alias Delivery

465(5)




Write a Delivery Agent Script

470(2)




Special Aliases

472(6)




The aliases Database

478(4)




Prevent Aliasing with-n

482(1)




Pitfalls

483(2)




Mailing Lists and ~/.forward

485(23)




Internal Mailing Lists

485(1)




:include: Mailing Lists

486(4)




Defining a Mailing List Owner

490(1)




Exploder Mailing Lists

491(1)




Problems with Mailing Lists

492(3)




Mail List Etiquette

495(4)




Packages That Help

499(1)




The User's ~/.forward File

500(6)




Pitfalls

506(2)




Signals, Transactions, and Syslog

508(22)




Signal the Daemon

508(4)




Log Transactions with-X

512(1)




Log with syslog

513(7)




Pitfalls

520(1)




Other Useful Logging

520(1)




Alphabetized syslog Equates

521(9)




Debug sendmail with -d

530(47)




The Syntax of-d

530(2)




The Behavior of-d

532(1)




Interpret the Output

533(2)




The-D Debug File Switch

535(1)




Table of All-d Categories

536(3)




Pitfalls

539(1)




Reference for-d in Numerical Order

540(37)




Part II. Configuration Reference





Configuration File Overview

577(7)




Overall Syntax

578(1)




Comments

579(1)




V8 Comments

579(1)




Continuation Lines

580(1)




The V Configuration Command

580(3)




Pitfalls

583(1)




Configure sendmail.cf with m4

584(64)




The m4 Preprocessor

584(3)




Configure with m4

587(7)




m4 Macros by Function

594(4)




Masquerading

598(4)




Relays

602(4)




UUCP Support

606(5)




Pitfalls

611(1)




Configuration File Feature Reference

611(37)




The R (Rules) Configuration Command

648(35)




Why Rules?

648(1)




The R Configuration Command

649(6)




Tokenizing Rules

655(2)




The Workspace

657(1)




The Behavior of a Rule

657(2)




The LHS

659(2)




The RHS

661(10)




Pitfalls

671(1)




Rule Operator Reference

672(11)




The S (Rule Sets) Configuration Command

683(28)




The S Configuration Command

683(6)




The Sequence of Rule Sets

689(1)




The canonify Rule Set 3

690(4)




The final Rule Set 4

694(2)




The parse Rule Set 0

696(4)




The localaddr Rule Set 5

700(2)




Rule Sets 1 and 2

702(1)




Pitfalls

703(1)




Policy Rule Set Reference

703(8)




The M (Mail Delivery Agent) Configuration Command

711(73)




The M Configuration Command

711(1)




The Symbolic Delivery Agent Name

712(1)




The me Configuration Syntax

713(3)




Delivery Agents by Name

716(20)




Delivery Agent Equates

736(20)




How a Delivery Agent Is Executed

756(2)




Pitfalls

758(1)




Delivery Agent F= Flags

759(25)




The D (Define a Macro) Configuration Command

784(70)




Preassigned sendmail Macros

785(1)




Command-Line Definitions

786(1)




Configuration-File Definitions

787(3)




Macro Names

790(1)




Macro Expansion: $ and $&

791(3)




Macro Conditionals: $?,$|, and $.

794(2)




Macros with me Configuration

796(2)




Pitfalls

798(1)




Alphabetized sendmail Macros

798(56)




The C and F (Class Macro) Configuration Commands

854(24)




Class Configuration Commands

854(9)




Access Classes in Rules

863(3)




Classes with me Configuration

866(2)




Internal Class Macros

868(1)




Pitfalls

869(1)




Alphabetized Class Macros

870(8)




The K (Database-Map) Configuration Command

878(69)




Enable at Compile Time

879(3)




The K Configuration Command

882(2)




The K Command Switches

884(8)




Use (dollar parantese-start)and $) in Rules

892(4)




Database Maps with me Configuration

896(1)




Pitfalls

897(1)




Alphabetized Database-Map Types

898(49)




The 0 (Options) Configuration Command

947(173)




Overview

948(1)




Command-Line Options

948(4)




Configuration File Options

952(1)




Options in the me File

953(6)




Alphabetical Table of All Options

959(4)




Option Argument Types

963(2)




Interrelating Options

965(5)




Pitfalls

970(1)




Alphabetized Options

970(150)




The H (Headers) Configuration Command

1120(49)




Overview

1120(1)




Header Names

1121(2)




Header Field Contents

1123(3)




?flags? in Header Definitions

1126(4)




Rules Check Header Contents

1130(8)




Header Behavior in conf.c

1138(5)




Headers and me Configuration

1143(1)




Headers by Category

1143(4)




Forwarding with Re-Sent Headers

1147(1)




Precedence

1148(2)




Pitfalls

1150(1)




Alphabetized Header Reference

1150(19)




The X (Milters) Configuration Command

1169(84)




Create Milter Support

1170(3)




Add Configuration Support

1173(8)




Build a Milter

1181(2)




Pitfalls

1183(1)




smfi_ Routine Reference

1183(20)




xxfi_ Routine Reference

1203(24)




Part III. Appendixes





The me Configuration Macros and Directives

1227(12)




What's New Since Edition 3

1239(9)




The checkcompat() Function

1248(5)
Bibliography1253(2)
Index1255

Om forfatteren

Bryan Costales is CTO with SL3D, Inc. in Boulder, Colorado. He has been active in system administration for over fifteen years and has been writing articles and books about computer software for more than twenty years. His most notable books are "C from A to Z" (Prentice Hall), "Unix Communications" (Howard Sams), and "sendmail" (O'Reilly).Claus Assmann is a member of the Sendmail Consortium and works for Sendmail, Inc. He is the maintainer of sendmail 8 and currently implements a new MTA (message transfer agent) named MeTA1. His main interests in computer technology are security and performance. He studied computer science at the University of Kiel in Germany, where he received his Ph.D. in 1992.George Jansen is a freelance writer who has worked with Bryan Costales on several of Bryan's books. His first novel, The Jesse James Scrapbook, is published by Hilliard & Harris. His second, The Fade-away, is published by Pocol Press. He lives in the Bay Area, drives a brand new Toyota Yaris, and enjoys baseball, classic jazz, and taking long naps.Gregory Shapiro began his professional career as a systems administrator for Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) after graduating from the university in 1992. During his tenure as Senior Unix Systems Administrator, he became involved with beta testing the BIND name server, the sendmail mail transfer agent, and other Unix utilities such as emacs and screen. His involvement with sendmail grew until he became Principal Engineer at Sendmail, Inc., where he continued to support the open source version while working on Sendmail's commercial products. He later moved into the IT team as the Senior Unix Network Systems Administrator. He is now Director, Strategic Technology at Sendmail, Inc. He is also a FreeBSD committer and has served as program committee member for BSDCon 2002 and program chair for BSDCon 2003. Greg lives in California and enjoys reading science fiction and fantasy books, traveling, and seeing movies and theater productions.