Screen Culture

History and Textuality

John Fullerton (Redaktør)

Screen Culture

Screen Culture: History and Textuality explores the impact of digital culture on the discipline of film and television studies. Whether the notion of screen culture is used to designate the technological platforms common to present-day digital media, or whether it refers to the support material on which moving images have historically been projected, scanned, or displayed, the 15 previously unpublished essays included here are primarily concerned with the intermedial appraisal of film, television, and digital culture. Les mer
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Screen Culture

Screen Culture: History and Textuality explores the impact of digital culture on the discipline of film and television studies. Whether the notion of screen culture is used to designate the technological platforms common to present-day digital media, or whether it refers to the support material on which moving images have historically been projected, scanned, or displayed, the 15 previously unpublished essays included here are primarily concerned with the intermedial appraisal of film, television, and digital culture.

Contributors are Richard Abel, William Boddy, Ben Brewster, John Fullerton, Douglas Gomery, Alison Griffiths, Vreni Hockenjos, Jan Holmberg, Arne Lunde, Peter Lunenfeld, Charles Musser, Jan Olsson, Barry Salt, Michele L. Torre, William Uricchio, and Malin Wahlberg.

Stockholm Studies in Cinema series
Distributed for John Libbey Publishing

Introduction, by John Fullerton 1. Rethinking film history through the textual Towards a history of theatrical culture: imagining an integrated historyof stage and screen, by Charles Musser; 'Garbo Talks!': Scandinavians in Hollywood, the talkie revolution, and thecrisis of foreign voice, by Arne Lunde; Artaud's radio: avant-gardism and the event of mediated sound, by Malin Wahlberg; Vitagraph films: a touch of real class, by Barry Salt; The Vitagraph fragments in the Library of Congress paper prints collection, by Ben Brewster; Filtering culture: symbolism, modernity and gender construction inEvgenii Bauer's films, by Michele L. Torre; Pressing inroads: metaspectators and the nickelodeon culture, by Jan Olsson; Finding the French on American screens, 1910-14, by Richard Abel 2. Rethinking textuality through technological change Re-discovering the challenge of textual instability: new media?s lessonsfor old media historians, by William Uricchio; The perfect machine: Hollis Frampton, avant-garde cinema and the promise of digital media, by Peter Lunenfeld; The sciopticon in Sweden: history and literary imagination, by Vreni Hockenjos; 'The largest picture ever executed by man': panoramas and the emergenceof large-screen and 360-degree technologies, by Alison Griffiths; Remote control: contextualising a modern device, by Jan Holmberg; Rethinking how TV came to the USA, by Douglas Gomery; Touching content: virtual advertising and digital television's recalcitrantaudience, by William Boddy

Explores the impact of digital culture on the discipline of film and television studies

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