The Neutral

Lecture Course at the College de France (1977-1978)

; Rosalind Krauss (Oversetter) ; Denis Hollier (Oversetter)

"I define the Neutral as that which outplays the paradigm, or rather I call Neutral everything that baffles paradigm." With these words, Roland Barthes describes a concept that profoundly shaped his work and was the subject of a landmark series of lectures delivered in 1978 at the College de France, just two years before his death. Les mer
Vår pris
405,-

(Paperback) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 7 virkedager

Paperback
Legg i
Paperback
Legg i
Vår pris: 405,-

(Paperback) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 7 virkedager

Om boka

"I define the Neutral as that which outplays the paradigm, or rather I call Neutral everything that baffles paradigm." With these words, Roland Barthes describes a concept that profoundly shaped his work and was the subject of a landmark series of lectures delivered in 1978 at the College de France, just two years before his death. Not published in France until 2002, and appearing in English for the first time, these creative and engaging lectures deepen our understanding of Roland Barthes's intellectual itinerary and reveal his distinctive style as thinker and teacher. The Neutral (le neutre), as Barthes describes it, escapes or undoes the paradigmatic binary oppositions that structure and produce meaning in Western thought and discourse. These binaries are found in all aspects of human society ranging from language to sexuality to politics. For Barthes, the attempt to deconstruct or escape from these binaries has profound ethical, philosophical, and linguistic implications.
The Neutral is comprised of the prewritten texts from which Barthes lectured and centers around 23 "figures," also referred to as "traits" or "twinklings," that are possible embodiments of the Neutral (sleep, silence, tact, etc.) or of the anti-Neutral (anger, arrogance, conflict, etc.). His lectures draw on a diverse set of authors and intellectual traditions, including Lao-tzu, Tolstoy, German mysticism, classical philosophy, Rousseau, Baudelaire, Walter Benjamin, and John Cage. Barthes's idiosyncratic approach to his subjects gives the lectures a playful, personal, and even joyous quality that enhances his rich insights. In addition to his reflections on a variety of literary and scholarly works, Barthes's personal convictions and the events of his life shaped the course and content of the lectures. Most prominently, as Barthes admits, the recent death of his mother and the idea of mourning shape several of his lectures.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse




































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Translators' Prefacexiii
Noticexix
Prefacexxi
Preliminariesxxix




SESSION OF FEBRUARY 18, 1978





Preliminaries

1(13)




Intertext





In Guise of Epigraphs

3(3)




Joseph de Maistre

4(1)




Tolstoy

5(1)




Rousseau

5(1)




Portrait of Lao-tzu by Himself

6(1)




Argument

6(2)




Processes of Preparation, of Exposition

8(4)




The Library

8(2)




Figures → ``The Neutral in Thirty Figures''

10(2)




The Desire for Neutral

12(2)




Pathos

12(1)




The Wirelike Sharpness of Mourning

13(1)




Benevolence

14(2)




Benevolentia

14(1)




Dry and Damp

15(1)




Emotion and Distance

15(1)




Weariness

16(4)




Placeless

16(2)




What Wearies

18(2)




SESSION OF FEBRUARY 25, 1978





Weariness (Continued)

20(1)




Rightness of Weariness

20(1)




Weariness as Work, as Game, as Creation

20(1)




Weariness as Work

20(1)




Weariness as Game

20(1)




Weariness as Creation

20(1)




Silence

21(8)




Sileo and Taceo

21(2)




To Outplay Speech

23(3)




To Keep Silent as Worldly Tactic

23(2)




Keeping Silent as the Obligation of an Inner ``Morality'': The Silence of the Skeptic

25(1)




Silence as Sign

26(1)




To Outplay Silence

27(2)




Tact

29(3)




Principle of Tact

29(1)




Twinklings of Tact

30(2)




Minutia

30(1)




Discretion

31(1)




SESSION OF MARCH 4, 1978





Supplement I

32(1)




Tact (Continued)

32(5)




Supplement and Not Redundancy

32(1)




Politeness as Thought of the Other, Consideration of and for Otherness

33(1)




Metaphorization

34(1)




Tact and Sociability

34(3)




Tact as the Social Obscene

34(1)




The Sabi, the Amorous

35(1)




Sweetness. Last (Provisional) Word on Tact

36(1)




Sleep

37(4)




The Neutral Awakening

37(1)




The Utopia of Sleep

37(3)




Sleep, Love, Benevolence

40(1)




Affirmation

41(6)




Language and Discourse

41(1)




Affirmation and Language

42(1)




Affirmation and Discourse

43(1)




Drags, Dodges, Hollow Corrections

44(3)




SESSION OF MARCH 11, 1978





Supplement II

47(5)




Color





The Colorless: Two References

49(1)




Interpretations

49(3)




Richness/Poverty

49(1)




Back/Front

50(1)




Origin

50(1)




Shimmer

51(1)




Indistinction

51(1)




The Adjective

52(10)




Adjective and Neutral

52(1)




Quality as Energy

53(2)




Foundation of the Thing, of the Name

53(1)




Quality as Desire

54(1)




Aggression Through the Adjective

55(3)




The Deprecating Adjective

56(1)




The Laudatory Adjective: The Compliment

56(1)




The Refusal of the Adjective

57(1)




To Dismiss Adjectives

58(2)




The Lover's Discourse

58(1)




The Sophists

58(1)




Negative Theology

59(1)




East

59(1)




The Time of the Adjective

60(2)




SESSION OF MARCH 18, 1978





Supplement III

62(7)




Images of the Neutral

69(4)




Depreciative Images

69(3)




Thankless

69(1)




Shirking

70(1)




Muffled

70(1)




Limp

70(1)




Indifferent

71(1)




Vile

72(1)




The Neutral as Scandal

72(1)




Anger

73(5)




States

74(3)




Anger

74(1)




Suffering/Queasiness

75(1)




Minimal Existence

76(1)




``Patho-logy''

77(1)




SESSION OF MARCH 25, 1978





Supplement IV

78(3)




The Active of the Neutral

81(5)




Active

81(1)




Features

82(3)




A-correction = Abstention from Correcting

82(1)




Contamination = Indifference to Being Contaminated

82(1)




No Ranking

82(1)




Relation to the Present

83(1)




Banality

83(1)




Weakness

83(1)




Strength

84(1)




Restraint

84(1)




Stupidity

85(1)




The Chinese Portrait

85(1)




Ideospheres

86(8)




Features

87(2)




Consistency

87(1)




The Lever

88(1)




Mania

88(1)




Ideosphere and Power (to sacrifice to fashion)

89(2)




Sincerity

91(1)




Perpetuity

92(2)




SESSION OF APRIL 1, 1978





Supplement V

94(1)




Consciousness

95(12)




Consciousness as Drug: Monsieur Teste

96(4)




M. Teste

96(1)




H.B.

97(2)




Differences and Identities

99(1)




The Valerian Self as Imaginary

100(7)




The Paradox

101(1)




``Sensibility''

102(1)




The Imaginary as Crisis

103(4)




SESSION OF APRIL 29, 1976





Answer

107(15)




Answer as Form

107(2)




Beside-the-Point Answers

109(5)




Departures, Flights, Silences, Forgettings

109(3)




Deviations

112(1)




Incongruities

113(1)




Another Logic, Another Dialogue

114(8)




SESSION OF MAY 6, 1978





Rites

122(3)




Public Rites

122(1)




Private Rites

123(1)




A Little Bit of Symbolic

124(1)




The Letter

124(1)




Conflict

125(4)




Banality of the Notion

125(1)




Coded Conflict

126(1)




Dodges

127(1)




Conflict as Meaning

128(1)




Supplement VI

129(1)




Oscillation

130(6)




Image and Etymologies

130(3)




Vibratory Time

133(3)




SESSION OF MAY 13, 1978

136(16)




Supplement VII

136(1)




Retreat

137(15)




The Gesture

137(6)




Rousseau

138(2)




Swedenborg

140(2)




Proust

142(1)




Organization

143(1)




Sitio

144(3)




Vita Nuova (Dante: Nova)

147(5)




Fantasy: Its Constituting Feature: Radicality

147(1)




Old Age

148(2)




Destitution

150(2)




SESSION OF MAY 20, 1978

152(59)




Arrogance

152(11)




Anorexia

152(2)




Western Frenzy

154(1)




Obviousness, Interpretation

155(1)




The Concept

156(1)




Memory/Forgetting

157(1)




Unity---Tolerance

158(4)




Writing

162(1)




Panoram

163(3)




Suppression of Time: Dreams

163(1)




Suppression of Suffering: Halcyonian Calm

164(2)




SESSION OF MAY 27, 1978





Supplement VIII

166(1)




Panorama (Continued)

166(3)




Sovereign Memory

166(2)




Ubiquiplace

168(1)




Kairos

169(6)




Sophist Kairos and Skeptical Kairos

169(1)




Sophists

169(1)




Skeptics

169(1)




The Two Kairos

170(1)




Validity and Truth

170(1)




Ambivalence of the Kairos

171(1)




The Satori

172(3)




In the Field of Rationality, of Empereia

173(1)




Outside the Field of Rationality

173(1)




``Ah, This!''

174(1)




The Perishable

175(1)




Wou-wei

175(7)




The Will-to-Live

175(1)




Wou-wei

176(1)




Figures of the West

177(1)




Leonardo da Vinci According to Freud

177(1)




Prince Andrew

178(1)




John Cage

178(1)




The Sacred

178(1)




To Abstain from

179(3)




Dietary Self-denial

179(1)




Pathetic Abstinence

180(1)




Pyrrhonian Abstinence

180(2)




SESSION OF JUNE 3, 1978





Wou-wei (Continued)

182(4)




Apathy

182(2)




Tao: Image of the Mirror

182(1)




Pyrrho

182(1)




Political Apathy

183(1)




To Be Sitting

184(2)




Tao

184(1)




Zen

185(1)




The Androgyne

186(10)




The Gender of Words

186(5)




The Grammarians' Neuter

187(2)




From Language to Discourse

189(2)




The Androgyne

191(5)




ANNEX





Intensities

196(5)




Neutral, Structure, Intensity

196(1)




Apophasis and Apheresis

197(1)




Name Changes

198(1)




Minimalism

199(2)




To Give Leave

201(5)




Epoche, Balance

201(2)




Epoche (Epechein)

201(1)




Balance

202(1)




Leave, Drift

203(3)




Fright

206(5)




Fright

207(1)




Anxiety

208(1)




Prayer

208(3)
Summary: Literary Semiology (M. Roland Barthes, Professor)211(2)
Notes213(48)
Bibliography261(8)
Name Index269(4)
Subject Index273

Om forfatteren

Roland Barthes was one of the most influential critics and philosophers of the twentieth century. His works include Mythologies, S/Z, A Lover's Discourse, and Camera Lucida. Rosalind Krauss is University Professor of Modern Art and Theory at Columbia University. She is the author of The Optical Unconscious, Formless: A User's Guide, The Picasso Papers, and Bachelors, among other works. Denis Hollier is Professor of French Literature at New York University. He is the editor of A New History of French Literature and the author of Absent Without Leave: French Literature Under the Threat of War.