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The Intelligible Ode

Intimations of Paradise

"Many attempts have been made to fit Wordsworth's thought to the various templates of Anglicanism, Methodism, Pantheism, or to the very different philosophies of Locke, Berkeley or Kant. But, bar that of Plato, he avowed no 'ism'. Davidson demonstrates that the framework of Wordsworth's thinking closely matches, and might be derived from, that of the very undogmatic Cambridge Platonists." Douglas Hedley, Professor of the Philosophy of Religion, University of Cambridge "A thorough investigation of the merits of Wordsworth's Intimations Ode from which any reader will learn. Freshly conceived, meticulously worked through, probing, respectful, exciting: a book to send readers back to the poem enlivened." James C.C. Mays, Emeritus Professor of Modern English and American poetry, University College Dublin "The fruit of a lifetime's engagement with Wordsworth, this is a deeply pondered, questioning study, full of insight into the poet's endless struggle to shape his thoughts. Of particular interest is how Davidson tackles Wordsworth's enigmatic 'life of things' and its relationship to the thing itself. Uniquely, his study of Traherne illustrates how the progress of the Ode follows the pattern of Traherne's thought." David Fairer, Emeritus Professor of English, University of Leeds "In this strikingly original discussion of Wordsworth's major poems, free of theoretical obfuscation, Graham Davidson persuasively demonstrates that the poet's refusal to publish his work in chronological order, and The Prelude in his lifetime, resulted in the failure of the Victorians and the Modernists, especially Eliot, to understand fully what he had done." Stephen Gill, Supernumerary Fellow, Lincoln College Oxford    

From its first
publication, what is now known as the Immortality Ode has been praised for the
magnificence of its verse and disparaged for its paucity of meaning - the
'immortality' of the subtitle unsubstantiated, and the 'recollections'
insubstantial. Les mer

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From its first
publication, what is now known as the Immortality Ode has been praised for the
magnificence of its verse and disparaged for its paucity of meaning - the
'immortality' of the subtitle unsubstantiated, and the 'recollections'
insubstantial. Yet Wordsworth's idea of immortality has clear precedents in the
seventeenth century, and recollections of childhood are Traherne's starting
point for the recovery of a lost vision comparable to Wordsworth's. Via the
power of the imagination, or reason, they believed they could experience a
renewed vision that both termed variously Paradise, or infinity, or
immortality.



Graham Davidson
traces the origins of Wordsworth's poetic impetus to his resistance to the
Cartesian division between mind and nature, first adumbrated by the Cambridge
Platonists. If reunited, Paradise was regained, but this personal trajectory
was tempered by a deep sympathy for the woes of mortal life. Davidson explores
the consequent dialogue through some of Wordsworth's best-known poems, at the
heart of which is the Ode. In the last section, he demonstrates how
Wordsworth's publishing history led the Victorians and modernists to
misinterpret his work; if one considers Eliot's Four Quartets as odes,
facing several of the same problems as did Wordsworth, there is some irony in
Eliot's dismissal of the Immortality Ode as 'verbiage'.



 

Detaljer

Forlag
Lutterworth Press
Innbinding
Innbundet
Språk
Engelsk
ISBN
9780718896430
Utgivelsesår
2023

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"Many attempts have been made to fit Wordsworth's thought to the various templates of Anglicanism, Methodism, Pantheism, or to the very different philosophies of Locke, Berkeley or Kant. But, bar that of Plato, he avowed no 'ism'. Davidson demonstrates that the framework of Wordsworth's thinking closely matches, and might be derived from, that of the very undogmatic Cambridge Platonists." Douglas Hedley, Professor of the Philosophy of Religion, University of Cambridge "A thorough investigation of the merits of Wordsworth's Intimations Ode from which any reader will learn. Freshly conceived, meticulously worked through, probing, respectful, exciting: a book to send readers back to the poem enlivened." James C.C. Mays, Emeritus Professor of Modern English and American poetry, University College Dublin "The fruit of a lifetime's engagement with Wordsworth, this is a deeply pondered, questioning study, full of insight into the poet's endless struggle to shape his thoughts. Of particular interest is how Davidson tackles Wordsworth's enigmatic 'life of things' and its relationship to the thing itself. Uniquely, his study of Traherne illustrates how the progress of the Ode follows the pattern of Traherne's thought." David Fairer, Emeritus Professor of English, University of Leeds "In this strikingly original discussion of Wordsworth's major poems, free of theoretical obfuscation, Graham Davidson persuasively demonstrates that the poet's refusal to publish his work in chronological order, and The Prelude in his lifetime, resulted in the failure of the Victorians and the Modernists, especially Eliot, to understand fully what he had done." Stephen Gill, Supernumerary Fellow, Lincoln College Oxford    

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