The Arms Trade Treaty

Weapons and International Law

Clare da Silva (Redaktør) ; Brian Wood (Redaktør)

This book was previously published by Larcier. By popular demand, it has been republished and is now available in ebook format. For full details, see the preliminary pages.

On 2 April 2013, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Arms Trade Treaty and on 24 December 2014, it entered into force. Les mer
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Vår pris: 1283,-

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Leveringstid: Usikker levering*
*Vi bestiller varen fra forlag i utlandet. Dersom varen finnes, sender vi den så snart vi får den til lager

Om boka

This book was previously published by Larcier. By popular demand, it has been republished and is now available in ebook format. For full details, see the preliminary pages.

On 2 April 2013, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Arms Trade Treaty and on 24 December 2014, it entered into force. This marked the end of a long road towards achieving the first global treaty regulating the international trade in conventional arms and preventing their illicit trade and diversion.

This book offers readers a concise and workable insight into each of the Articles of this important legal instrument, as well as its negotiation and scope of application. It brings together renowned state practitioners, legal academics and non-governmental expert analysts with different perspectives and backgrounds, many of whom were directly involved in the negotiation of the Treaty itself.

The Arms Trade Treaty will provide a comprehensive commentary to guide academics, officials, diplomats and others in the implementation of the Treaty.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Introduction (p. 1)

Preamble (p. 5)

Article 1: Object and Purpose (p. 15)

Article 2: Scope (p. 24)

Article 3: Ammunition/Munitions (p. 58)

Article 4: Parts and Components (p. 76)

Article 5: General Implementation (p. 89)

Article 6: Prohibitions (p. 103)

Article 7: Export and Export Assessment (p. 142)

Article 8: Import (p. 175)

Article 9: Transit or Trans-Shipment (p. 192)

Article 10: Brokering (p. 220)

Article 11: Diversion (p. 246)

Article 12: Record Keeping (p. 262)

Article 13: Reporting (p. 278)

Article 14: Enforcement (p. 304)

Article 15: International Cooperation (p. 321)

Article 16: International Assistance (p. 329)

Article 17: Conference of States Parties (p. 341)

Article 18: Secretariat (p. 352)

Article 19: Dispute Settlement (p. 365)

Article 20: Amendments (p. 373)

Article 21: Signature, Ratification, Acceptance, Approval or Accession (p. 377)

Article 22: Entry into Force (p. 382)

Article 23: Provisional Application (p. 389)

Article 24: Duration and Withdrawal (p. 393)

Article 25: Reservations (p. 397)

Article 26: Relationship with Other International Agreements (p. 405)

Article 27: Depositary (p. 418)

Article 28: Authentic Texts (p. 422)

Om forfatteren

CLARE DA SILVA is a legal and policy consultant working in the areas of conventional arms control, armed violence reduction and international human rights law. She was the legal advisor on the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) for Amnesty International from 2007 to 2014 and an advisor to the Nigerian delegation during the 2012 and 2013 United Nations Conferences on the ATT. She was a co-drafter of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime Model Law on the Firearms Protocol and has worked on UN projects addressing fi rearms trafficking and armed violence reduction. She also worked as a defence lawyer for four years at the Special Court for Sierra Leone. She was a Research Fellow at the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law (Cambridge University) from 2003 to 2005. She studied at the University of Toronto, and received her law degree from the University of Ottawa.

BRIAN WOOD was the head of Amnesty International' s research and policy on arms control and human rights. In the mid-1990s he initiated proposals with Nobel Peace Laureates for what has become the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), and attended all the United Nations (UN) preparatory meetings and the two negotiating conferences. After the Treaty was passed, he took sabbatical leave to manage a UN-funded project on digital learning about the ATT. In 1999 he co-wrote, with Johan Peleman,'' The Arms Fixers: controlling the Brokers and Shipping Agents '' , the first detailed study of arms brokering (sponsored by the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs). Later he served as consultant to the UN Group of Government Experts on the prevention of illicit brokering in small arms and light weapons. He has twice addressed the UN Security Council to propose measures to strengthen the design and implementation of UN arms embargoes, and co-authored a study for improving end use and end user control systems, published in 2011 by the UN Office for Disarmament Affairs. He has researched issues relating to weapons and policing more widely, designing proposals for the European Union regulations to prevent trade in equipment used for torture. He studied economics and sociology at Rhodes University in South Africa and at the London School of Economics and Political Science.