Phytoremediation

Management of Environmental Contaminants, Volume 6

Abid A. Ansari (Redaktør) ; Sarvajeet Singh Gill (Redaktør) ; Ritu Gill (Redaktør) ; Guy R. Lanza (Redaktør) ; Lee Newman (Redaktør)

This text details the plant-assisted remediation method, "phytoremediation", which involves the interaction of plant roots and associated rhizospheric microorganisms for the remediation of soil contaminated with high levels of metals, metalloids, fuel and oil hydrocarbons, nano particles, pesticides, solvents, organic compounds and various other contaminants. Les mer
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Vår pris: 3375,-

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Leveringstid: Usikker levering*
*Vi bestiller varen fra forlag i utlandet. Dersom varen finnes, sender vi den så snart vi får den til lager
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Om boka

This text details the plant-assisted remediation method, "phytoremediation", which involves the interaction of plant roots and associated rhizospheric microorganisms for the remediation of soil contaminated with high levels of metals, metalloids, fuel and oil hydrocarbons, nano particles, pesticides, solvents, organic compounds and various other contaminants. Many chapters highlight and compare the efficiency and economic advantages of phytoremediation and nano-phytoremediation to currently practiced soil and water treatment practices.
Volume 6 of Phytoremediation: Management of Environmental Contaminants continues the series. Taken together, the six volumes provide a broad-based global synopsis of the current applications of phytoremediation using plants and the microbial communities associated with their roots to decontaminate terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

SECTION-1: PHYTOREDIATION APPLICATIONS: AN UPDATE1. Phytoremediation as green infrastructure: an overviewDr. Frank SleegersDepartment of Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning, 109 Hills North, University of Massachusetts, 111 Thatcher Road , Ofc 1, Amherst, MA 01003-9357E-mail: sleegers@larp.umass.edu
2. Overview of phytoremediation applicationsDr. Fares Khairy KhalifaDepartment of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdul Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaE-mail: fkkhalifa@kau.edu.sa
3. Phyto and bioremedition strategies for soils and wastewatersDr. A.P. PintoUniversidade de Evora, Departamento de Quimica, Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Rua Romao Ramalho, 59, 7000-671 Evora, Portugal.E-mail: app@uevora.pt
SECTION-2: PHYTOREMEDIATION APPLICATIONS FOR CONTAMINATED SOILS4. Sorption - release processes in soil: the basis of phytoremediation efficiencyDr. G. PetruzzelliInstitute of Ecosystem Study CNR Pisa ItalyEmail: gianniantonio.petruzzelli@ise.cnr.it
5. Assisted phytoremediation technology with soil amendmentsDr. Tiziana LaiDICAAR, Department of Civil-Environmental Engineering and Architecture, University of Cagliari, Piazza d'Armi, 09123 Cagliari (Italy)E-mail: lai.tiziana@gmail.com
6. Phytoextraction of metals from contaminated soils.Dr. Luis NovoGeoBioTec Research Center, Department of Geosciences, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, PortugalE-mail: novo@ua.pt
7. Phytoremediation of Boron-Contaminated SoilsDr. Consuelo D.P. RamilaIngeniero en Biotecnologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de ChileE-mail: consueloramila@gmail.com
8. Phytoremediation and necrophytoremediation of petrogenic hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.Dr. Esmaeil ShahsavariSchool of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia E-mails: esmaeil.shahsavari@rmit.edu.au
SECTION-3: PHYTOREMEDIATION APPLICATIONS FOR CONTAMINATED WATERS 9. Phytoremediation of contaminated waterDr. G. AnushaDepartment of Civil Engineering, Bannari Amman Institute of Technology, Sathyamangalam-638401, Tamilnadu, IndiaE-mail: anushanivasbit@gmail.com
10. PGPR assisted phytoremediation of heavy metal from municipal waste waterDr. Asghari BanoDepartment of Plant Sciences Quaidi- azam University Islamabad, Pakistan E-mail: banoasghari@gmail.com.
11. Constructed Wetland technology to treat water contaminated with fuel and oil hydrocarbonsDr. Alexandros I. StefanakisConstructed Wetlands Competence Centre, BAUER, Muscat, Oman, Visiting Lecturer, Department of Engineering, German University of Technology in OmanE-mail: stefanakis.alexandros@gmail.com; alexandros.stefanakis@bauer.de
12. Phytoremediation of waste and wastewater: On-site and full-scale applicationsDr. G. BasilicoMuseoArgentino de CienciasNaturales "Bernardino Rivadavia" - CONICET, Av. Angel Gallardo 470 - C1405DJR - Buenos Aires - Argentina E-mail: gabrielomarbasilico@hotmail.com
SECTION-4: PHYTOREMEDIATION AND MICROBIAL APPLICATIONS13. Fungi in the bioremediation of contaminants in water Dr. Demet Cansaran-DUMANAnkara University, Biotechnology Institute, Ankara, Turkey. E-mail: dcansaran@yahoo.com
14. Phytoremediation of chromium polluted soil using plants in conjunction with microbesDr. Muhammad FaisalDepartment of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, university of the Punjab, Lahore, PakistanE-mail: mohdfaysal@yahoo.com
15. Microorganisms in the phytoremediation applicationsDr. Laura. de CaboMuseoArgentino de CienciasNaturales "Bernardino Rivadavia" - ConsejoNacional de Investigaciones Cientificasy Tecnicas. Av. Angel Gallardo 470, CABA, Argentina. E-mail: ldecabo@macn.gov.ar
16. Phytoremediation using microbial assemblages in soil and waterDr. Anna GrobelakCzestochowa University of Technology, Department of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology, J.H. Dabrowskiego 71, 42 200 CzestochowaE-mail: agrobelak@is.pcz.czest.pl
17. Microbe assisted enhancement of phytoremediation: ProspectsDr. Paulo J. C. FavasUniversity of Tras-os-Montes e Alto Douro, UTAD, School of Life Sciences and the Environment, Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal.E-mail: pjcf@utad.pt
SECTION-5: PHYTOREMEDIATION APPLICATIONS OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS 18. Phytoremediation of organic pollutants using aquatic and terrestrial plant species Dr. Jesitha KDept. of Chemistry, Sree Sankara College, Kalady, Ernakulam, Kerala, IndiaE-mail: jessysreejith@gmail.com
19. Phytoremediation of landfill leachatesDr. Enrique Javier Pena SalamancaCalle 13 N 100 - 00, Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia.E-mail: enrique.pena@correounivalle.edu.co
20. Nicotine contamination of agricultural crops: sources, risks and solutionsDr. T. AlshaalSoil Ecology, Kafrelsheikh University, EgyptE-mail: alshaaltarek@gmail.com
SECTION-6: SPECIALIZED PLANT SPECIES FOR PHYTOREMEDIATION21. Salix spp. in the phytoextraction of heavy metals.Dr. Milan ZupunskiUniversity of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, Novi Sad, SerbiaE-mail: milan.zupunski@dbe.uns.ac.rs
22. Brassica spp. in the phytoextraction of heavy metalsDr. Shafaqat AliDepartment of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Government College University, AllamaIqbal Road, 38000 Faisalabad, PakistanE-mail: shafaqataligill@yahoo.com23. Dendroremediation - important role of trees in environment decontaminationDr. M. MleczekDept. of Chemistry, PULS, Poznan, PolandE-mail: miroslaw.mleczek@up.poznan.pl

24. The possibility of use of oilseeds plants and grasses for phytoremediation Dr. Saule AtabayevaAl-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty, KazakhstanE-mail: sauleat@yandex.kz
25. Woody species in phytoremediation applications for contaminated soilsDr. Elena MasarovicovaDepartment of Soil Science, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Ilkovicova 6, SK-84215 Bratislava, Slovak RepublicE-mail: masarovicova@nic.fns.uniba.sk
SECTION-7: NANO-PHYTOREMEDIATION APPLICATIONS26. Nano-phytoremediation: An updateDr. Xiaoqin NieSouthwest University of Science and Technology, Qinglong Av. 59, Fucheng Dist., Mianyang, Sichuan Pro., P. R. China, 621010 Email: xiaoqin_nie@163.com;niexiaoqin@swust.edu.cnr
27. Impact of engineered nanoparticles on the phytoextraction efficiency of environmental pollutantsDr. Samuel Ma, P.E.Zachry Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University, 3136 TAMU, College Station, TX, 77843-3136Email: xma@civil.tamu.edu
28. Application of nano-phytoremediation technology for the remediation of soil polluted with pesticide residues and heavy metalsDr. P.S. HarikumarSenior Principal Scientist and Head, Water Quality Division Centre for Water Resources Development & Management(CWRDM) Calicut (Kozhikode) Kerala, India. E-mail: drpshari@yahoo.co.in, hps@cwrdm.org
29. Enhanced Phytoremediation of Contaminated Soil Using Engineered Nano-MaterialsDr. Weilan Zhang The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong KongE-mail: zhangweilan88@tamu.edu
30. Nano-phytoremediation applications for contaminated watersDr. Madhulika BhatiNational Institute of Science, Technology and Development Studies, K.S.Krishnan Marg, New Delhi, Delhi 110012, India.E-mail: madhupratya@gmail.com

Om forfatteren

Abid A. Ansari is assistant professor in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia. Dr. Ansari's research work is concerned with phytoremediation and eutrophication. Dr. Ansari has to his credit a number of research articles of national and international repute, eleven edited books, and a number of book chapters on varied aspects of his field of research. He has been awarded Scientist of the Year and Environmentalist of the Year by the National Environmental Science Academy, India, and Research Excellence by the University of Tabuk.
Dr. Sarvajeet Singh Gill is currently working as Professor (Asstt.) at Centre for Biotechnology, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak, Haryana, India. Dr. Sarvajeet Gill's research includes abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants, reactive oxygen species signaling and antioxidant machinery, gene expression, helicases, crop improvement, transgenics, nitrogen & sulfur metabolism and plant fungal symbiotic interactions. Together with Dr. Narendra Tuteja at ICGEB, New Delhi, he worked on plant helicases for abiotic stress tolerance. His research uncovered new pathways to plant abiotic stress tolerance and indicates the potential for improving crop production at sub-optimal conditions. Sarvajeet Gill has edited several books with Springer, Wiley, Elsevier, CABI etc and has a number of research papers, review articles, and book chapters to his name. Recently, Dr. Sarvajeet Gill conferred with INDIA Research Excellence & Citation Award - 2017 from Clarivate Analytics (Web of Science).
Dr. Ritu Gill is currently working as Professor (Asstt.) at Centre for Biotechnology, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak, Haryana, India. Dr. Gill is working on phytoremediation, plant abiotic stress and molecular aspects of host-parasite relations. She has published a number of refereed journal articles, book chapters, books. She has been awarded with various research fellowships along with the Young Scientist Award by the Indian Society for Parasitology.
Guy R. Lanza is a Research Professor in the Department of Environmental and Forest Biology, State University of New York. He also serves as Secretary of the International Expert Advisory Council at the University of Tyumen, Russia. He has previously worked at the Office of Environmental Sciences, Smithsonian Institution, Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University, the Environmental Science programs at both the University of Texas (Dallas) and the University of Massachusetts (Amherst). His primary research interests are in environmental microbiology, phytoremediation, and aquatic ecology. He has published more than 80 refereed journal articles, book chapters, books, and technical reports. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, serves on the editorial boards of several microbiology journals and served as a Fulbright Scholar in Vietnam and Russia.
Lee Newman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental and Forest Biology, State University of New York. Dr. Lee's primary research interests are in phytoremediation and interactions between plants and endophytic bacteria. She has published a number of refereed journal articles, book chapters, books, and technical reports.