Don't Believe A Word

From Myths to Misunderstandings - How Language Really Works

'Wonderful. You finish the book more alive than ever to the enduring mystery and miracle of that thing that makes us most human' STEPHEN FRY

'Most popular books on language dumb down; Shariatmadari's smartens things up, and is all the more entertaining for it' THE SUNDAY TIMES, a Book of the Year

'A meaty, rewarding and necessary read' GUARDIAN

'Fascinating and thought-provoking . Les mer
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128,-

(Paperback)
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Paperback
Legg i
Paperback
Legg i
Vår pris: 128,-

(Paperback)
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 7 virkedager
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Om boka

'Wonderful. You finish the book more alive than ever to the enduring mystery and miracle of that thing that makes us most human' STEPHEN FRY

'Most popular books on language dumb down; Shariatmadari's smartens things up, and is all the more entertaining for it' THE SUNDAY TIMES, a Book of the Year

'A meaty, rewarding and necessary read' GUARDIAN

'Fascinating and thought-provoking . . . crammed with weird and wonderful facts . . . for anyone who delights in linguistics it's a richly rewarding read' MAIL ON SUNDAY

- A word's origin doesn't tell you what it means today
- There are languages that change when your mother-in-law is present
- The language you speak could make you more prone to accidents
- There's a special part of the brain that produces swear words

Taking us on a mind-boggling journey through the science of language, linguist David Shariatmadari uncovers the truth about what we do with words, exploding nine widely-held myths about language while introducing us to some of the fundamental insights of modern linguistics.

Fakta

Om forfatteren

David Shariatmadari is a writer and editor at the Guardian. He studied Linguistics at Cambridge University and the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, where he now lives.