Credit Where Credit Is Due

Respecting Authorship and Intellectual Property

Patricia Ann Mabrouk (Redaktør) ; Judith Currano (Redaktør)

This volume is based on the symposium, "The Write Thing to Do: Ethical Considerations in Authorship & the Assignment of Credit," held at the 253rd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in 2017. Les mer
Vår pris
1638,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

Innbundet
Legg i
Innbundet
Legg i
Vår pris: 1638,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

Om boka

This volume is based on the symposium, "The Write Thing to Do: Ethical Considerations in Authorship & the Assignment of Credit," held at the 253rd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in 2017. Both editors, serving on the ACS Committee on Ethics, felt that there was a need for more focused, in-depth resources on critical ethical issues, such as assignment of credit. Patricia Ann Mabrouk and Judith Currano then set a goal to develop a robust resource
that explores the central issues from a variety of perspectives within the greater chemical community of practice encouraging a healthy discussion of the key issues related to assignment of credit including authorship, contributor-ship, inventorship, and copyright.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Preface
Acknowledgments

Assigning Credit: Defining Authorship, Contributorship, Inventorship, and Copyright
1. Assigning Credit and Ensuring Accountability
2. Case Study: An Editor's Perspective on Authorship
3. Contributorship and Authorship Hierarchy as a Form of Credit
4. Case Study: Contributorship and Authorship Hierarchy as a Form of Credit
5. You Stole My Invention! Authorship and Inventorship Considerations in Honoring Non-Disclosure Agreements
6. Case Study: The Difference Between Authorship and Inventorship
7. Misconceptions about Copyright and Permissions
8. Case Study: Authorship Issues and Conflict in the U.S. Academic Chemical
Community
9. Teaching Students Where Credit Is Due
10. Case Study: Teaching Responsible Authorship Practices to Graduate
Students

Authorship in Collaborative Research Projects
11. A Roadmap to Successful Collaborations between Primarily Undergraduate Institutions and Research Institutions
12. Case Study: A Roadmap to Successful Collaborations Between Primarily Undergraduate Institutions and Research Institutions
13. Authorship in Undergraduate Research Partnerships: A Really Bad Tango Between Undergraduate Proteges and Graduate Student Mentors While Waiting for Professor Godot
14. Case Study: Authorship with Students in the Research Group at the Research University
15. Patterns in Authorship: Lessons in Diversity and Justice
16. Case Study: Authorship in an Interdisciplinary World
17. Case Study: Patterns in Authorship: Lessons in Diversity and Justice

Editors' Biographies
Author Index
Subject Index

Om forfatteren

Patricia Ann Mabrouk (PAM) is Professor of Chemistry & Chemical Biology at Northeastern University (NU). PAM received her A.B. in chemistry and mathematics from Wellesley College and her Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where she studied with Mark S. Wrighton. She received an NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship and studied with Edward Ira Solomon before joining the NU faculty in 1990. Over the years, PAM's
research interests have included green polymer chemistry, biomolecular recognition in heme proteins, supercritical fluid electrochemistry, educational research on the efficacy of research ethics training, development of models for graduate student mentoring, problem-based learning, undergraduate research, research ethics,
reflective journaling and graduate education.
PAM is an ACS Fellow, a CASE Massachusetts Professor of the Year, and an NSF CAREER awardee. Over the past twenty-seven years PAM has published over fifty peer-reviewed publications, obtained

one U.S. patent, authored two books, served as Editor for an ACS Symposium Series volume on active learning, and organized or co-organized six symposia at ACS National Meetings since 2000. She is very active in ACS and CUR and has served in various capacities at the local and national levels. She is currently a member of the ACS Ethics Committee.

Judith N. Currano is the Head of the Chemistry Library at the University of Pennsylvania, where she teaches a graduate course in chemical information. She received her B.A. in chemistry and English from the University of Rochester, and she earned an M.S. in Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research interests lie in three areas of chemical information education: training chemists to navigate the literature, introducing basic
chemical principles to librarians, and teaching substructure search techniques.
Judith received the Special Library Association's (SLA) 2016 Rose L. Vormelker Award in

recognition of her commitment to chemical information literacy, a subject on which she regularly publishes and presents. She is active in SLA's Chemistry Division and offers short courses and Webinars that teach basic principles of chemistry and chemical information to librarians. Judith coedited "Chemical Information for Chemists: A Primer," published by the RSC in 2014, and coedited two ACS Symposium Series volumes the same year. She was elected to the Board of Trustees of the Cambridge
Crystallographic Data Centre in 2014, and she has served on library advisory boards for many chemical information providers, including ACS Publications, CAS, Science of Synthesis, and Bio-Rad's KnowItAll. She is active in the ACS and serves in various capacities at national, division, and local levels.
Judith currently chairs the ACS Committee on Ethics, and she has served as Chair of the ACS Division of Chemical Information (CINF) and has edited CINF's quarterly newsletter. In her spare time, Judith advises

Penn's Women in Chemistry group, and she has been a Girl Scout troop leader since 1999.