Designing New Heterogeneous Catalysts

Faraday Discussion 188

Royal Society of Chemistry (Bidragsyter)

Serie: Faraday Discussions Volume 188

Catalysis is a core area of contemporary science posing major fundamental and conceptual challenges, while being at the heart of the chemical industry. At this discussion, we bring the catalysis community together to explore the modern methods used to design new catalysts and how these approaches can bridge across the disciplines of physical sciences and chemical engineering. Les mer
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Vår pris: 2869,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Om boka

Catalysis is a core area of contemporary science posing major fundamental and conceptual challenges, while being at the heart of the chemical industry. At this discussion, we bring the catalysis community together to explore the modern methods used to design new catalysts and how these approaches can bridge across the disciplines of physical sciences and chemical engineering.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Catalyst Design from Theory to Practice; Designing New Catalysts: Synthesis of New Active Structures; Bridging Model and Real Catalysts; Application of Novel Catalysts.

Om forfatteren

Faraday Discussions documents a long-established series of Faraday Discussion meetings which provide a unique international forum for the exchange of views and newly acquired results in developing areas of physical chemistry, biophysical chemistry and chemical physics. The papers presented are published in the Faraday Discussion volume together with a record of the discussion contributions made at the meeting. Faraday Discussions therefore provide an important record of current international knowledge and views in the field concerned. The latest (2012) impact factor of Faraday Discussions is 3.82.