DNA Barcoding in Marine Perspectives

Assessment and Conservation of Biodiversity

Subrata Trivedi (Redaktør) ; Abid Ali Ansari (Redaktør) ; Sankar K. Ghosh (Redaktør) ; Hasibur Rehman (Redaktør)

More than two third of the surface area of our planet is covered by oceans and assessment of the marine biodiversity is a challenging task. With the increasing global population, there is a tendency to exploit marine recourses for food, energy and other requirements. Les mer
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Paperback
Legg i
Vår pris: 2363,-

(Paperback) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Om boka

More than two third of the surface area of our planet is covered by oceans and assessment of the marine biodiversity is a challenging task. With the increasing global population, there is a tendency to exploit marine recourses for food, energy and other requirements. This puts pressure on the fragile marine environment and needs sustainable conservation efforts. Marine species identification using traditional taxonomical methods are often burdened with taxonomic controversies. Here in this book we will discuss the comparatively new concept of DNA barcoding and its significance in marine perspective. This molecular technique can be helpful in the assessment of cryptic species which are widespread in marine environment, and can also be used to link the different life cycle stages to the adult which is difficult to accomplish in marine ecosystems. Other advantages of DNA barcoding include authentication and safety assessment of seafood, wildlife forensics, conservation genetics and detection of invasive alien species (IAS). Global DNA barcoding efforts in the marine habitat include MarBOL, CeDAMar, CMarZ, SHARK-BOL, etc. DNA barcoding of different marine groups ranging from the microbes to mammals is to be revealed. In conjugation with newer and faster techniques like high throughput sequencing, DNA barcoding is serving as an effective modern tool in marine biodiversity assessment and conservation.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

1. DNA Barcoding in the Marine Habitat: An Overview.- 2. Measurement of a Barcode's Accuracy in Identifying Species.- 3. DNA barcoding: a tool to assess and conserve marine biodiversity.- 4. Safety Assessment and authentication of seafood through DNA barcoding.- 5. Bioinformatics tools in Marine DNA Barcoding.- 6. Morphological and COI sequence based charactersation of Marine Polychaete Species from Great Nicobar Island, India.- 7. Revised Phylogeny of Extant Xiphosurans (Horseshoe Crabs).- 8. DNA Barcoding in marine nematodes: successes and pitfalls.- 9. DNA barcoding of calanoid copepods from the gulf of california.- 10. DNA Barciding of Primitive Species - Nemertine from Sundarbans Marine Bio-Resourse.- 11. Future Perspectives of DNA Barcoding in Marine Zooplanktons and Invertebrates.- 12. Molecular Positioning of Living Fossils (Horseshoe Crab) Using DNA Barcoding Approach.- 13. Mitochondrial DNA diversity of Wild and Hatchery Reared Strains of Indian Lates calcarifer (Bloch).- 14. Barcoding Antarctic fishes: species discrimination and contribution to elucidate ontogenetic changes in Nototheniidae.- 15. Barcoding of Indian marine fishes: For identification and conservation.- 16. DNA barcoding Identifies Brackish Water fishes from Nallavadu Lagoon, Puducherry, India.- 17. DNA Barcoding of Marine fish: Prospects and Challenges.- 18. DNA Barcoding in Phytoplankton and other algae in Marine Ecosystem: An Effective Tool for Biodiversity Assessment.- 19. A search for a single DNA barcode for seagrasses of the world.

Om forfatteren

Dr. Subrata Trivedi, Ph.DDepartment of BiologyFaculty of ScienceUniversity of TabukTabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabiastriverdi@ut.edu.satriverdi.subrata@gmail.com
Abid A AnsariDepartment of BiologyFaculty of Science University of TabukTabuk-71491, Kingdom of Saudi Arabiaaansari@ut.edu.saaaansari40@gmail.com
Dr. Sankar K. Ghosh, Ph.D.Department of Biotechnology, Assam UniversitySilchar-788011Assam, IndiaSankar.kumar.ghosh@aus.ac.indrsankarghosh@gmail.com
Hasibur Rehman, Ph.D
Department of Biology
Faculty of Sciences
University of Tabuk
Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA)

hrehman@ut.edu.sa