Eye Tracking for the Chemistry Education Researcher

Jessica R. VandenPlas (Redaktør) ; Sarah J. R. Hansen (Redaktør) ; Steven Cullipher (Redaktør)

The idea for an ACS symposium series for eye tracking started to form in the summer of 2015. Each of the editors had experience with eye tracking from our dissertation research and upon further discussion, discovered they all had the same questions: What type of eye tracker should be used? What types of research questions can eye tracking answer? What should be considered concerning experimental design? How could the results be analyzed in a meaningful way? With no
clear help from the existing chemistry education research (CER) literature, the editors had to expand their reading to the fields of psychology, consumer analysis, and product design to find suitable answers. Les mer
Vår pris
1638,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

Innbundet
Legg i
Innbundet
Legg i
Vår pris: 1638,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

Om boka

The idea for an ACS symposium series for eye tracking started to form in the summer of 2015. Each of the editors had experience with eye tracking from our dissertation research and upon further discussion, discovered they all had the same questions: What type of eye tracker should be used? What types of research questions can eye tracking answer? What should be considered concerning experimental design? How could the results be analyzed in a meaningful way? With no
clear help from the existing chemistry education research (CER) literature, the editors had to expand their reading to the fields of psychology, consumer analysis, and product design to find suitable answers. When they spoke with chemistry education researchers who were interested in eye tracking,
they discovered these same questions were prevalent among them as well; and often, they did not even know where to start. At that point, they decided that an eye-tracking guidebook aimed at chemistry education researchers could be a valuable resource.

This book is not intended to be a review of eye tracking in CER literature; rather, it is meant to be a tool to help answer the same questions the editors had when they started out in the field. The editors also hope that those with some experience in eye tracking will find among these pages ideas they had not considered applying to their research, but that will be valuable to them moving forward.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Preface

1. Eye Tracking as a Research Tool: An Introduction
2. Eye Tracking in Chemistry Education Research: Study Logistics
3. What They See Impacts the Data You Get: Selection and Design of Visual Stimuli
4. Using Fixations To Measure Attention
5. Sequence Analysis: Use of Scanpath Patterns for Analysis of Students' Problem-Solving Strategies
6. Advanced Methods for Processing and Analyzing Eye-Tracking Data Using R
7. Using Multiple Psychophysiological Techniques To Triangulate the Results of Eye-Tracking Data
8. Beyond Gaze Data: Pupillometry as an Additional Data Source in Eye Tracking
9. Coupling Eye Tracking with Verbal Articulation in the Evaluation of Assessment Materials Containing Visual Representations
10. Studying the Language of Organic Chemistry: Visual Processing and Practical Considerations for Eye-Tracking Research in Structural Notation

Editors' Biographies
Author Index
Subject Index

Om forfatteren

Jessica R. VandenPlas is Associate Professor of Chemistry at Grand Valley State University. She received her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology with an emphasis in Chemistry Education from the Catholic University of America. Her research focuses on problem solving and visualization use in general chemistry.

Sarah J. R. Hansen is Lecturer in Chemistry at Columbia University and holds a Ph.D. in Science Education with a focus on Chemistry Education. She has served as a Chemistry faculty member since 2002. Her research includes curriculum design and assessment as well as visual problem solving strategies.

Steven Cullipher is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Massachusetts Maritime Academy in Bourne, MA. He received his Ph.D. in Green Chemistry, with a focus on Chemistry Education, from the University of Massachusetts Boston in 2015. His research interests include student reasoning about real-world environmental problems and classroom use of social media technologies.