Strategies Promoting Success of Two-Year College Students

Laura Anna (Redaktør) ; Thomas Higgins (Redaktør) ; Alycia Palmer (Redaktør) ; Kalyn Owens (Redaktør)

Nearly half of all undergraduate students enroll in a two-year college, and many STEM students take their introductory chemistry courses at a two-year college. The educational pathway of these students is often complex and nonlinear towards completion of a certificate, degree and/or transfer to a four-year program. Les mer
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Om boka

Nearly half of all undergraduate students enroll in a two-year college, and many STEM students take their introductory chemistry courses at a two-year college. The educational pathway of these students is often complex and nonlinear towards completion of a certificate, degree and/or transfer to a four-year program. These non-traditional pathways present distinct challenges in and out of the classroom for the educators who are trying to serve this important and
diverse group of students. This book provides some insight into the current state of chemistry education reform at two-year colleges, provides specific ways to address some of the challenges of educating two-year college students, and reports strategies for success in chemistry at the two-year college. The
contributing authors are chemical educators who have presented at one or more of our Strategies Promoting Success of Two-year College Students symposia that have been held at the Spring ACS National meetings since 2015.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Preface

Student Engagement and Collaborations
1. Trying on Teaching: Transforming STEM Classrooms with a Learning Assistant Program
2. Synergistic Efforts To Support Early STEM Students
3. Improving Student Outcomes with Supplemental Instruction
4. Using Strategic Collaborations To Expand Instrumentation Access at Two-Year Colleges

Curricular Innovations
5. Development of a Pre-Professional Program at a Rural Community College
6. Student Affective State: Implications for Prerequisites and Instruction in Introductory Chemistry Classes
7. In-Class Worksheets for Student Engagement and Success
8. A Tool Box Approach for Student Success in Chemistry Undergraduate Research Opportunities
9. Identifying, Recruiting, and Motivating Undergraduate Student Researchers at a Community College
10. Honors Modules To Infuse Research into the Chemistry Curriculum
11. College Students Get Excited about Whiskey: The Pseudo-Accidental
Creation of a Thriving Independent Student Research Program at a Two-Year Community College

NSF Funding Programs
12. What To Know Before You Write Your First NSF Proposal

Editors' Biographies
Author Index
Subject Index

Om forfatteren

Laura J. Anna is Professor of Chemistry at Montgomery College, a diverse, three-campus community college, in the DC metro region of Maryland. She has been teaching organic chemistry for over 20 years and is currently serving as Department Chair.

Thomas B. Higgins is Professor of Chemistry at Harold Washington College, an urban community college where a majority of the students are from groups underrepresented in STEM. He has been teaching chemistry, astronomy, and physical sciences there for 21 years. In 2016, he was named a Fellow of the ACS, primarily for his work in broadening participation and his contributions to ACS governance.

Alycia Palmer is Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Montgomery College where she teaches introductory and general chemistry. She is a strong supporter of Open Educational Resources and has worked to develop materials that are available to students at any institution for no cost.

Kalyn Owens is Professor of Chemistry at North Seattle College

where she has been teaching general chemistry and STEM research courses for 15 years. She is passionate about designing innovative curriculum for early postsecondary STEM courses with emphasis on interdisciplinary curriculum, course-based research experiences and engaging students in social construction of new knowledge.