The Future of Creation Order

Vol. 2, Order Among Humans: Humanities, Social Science and Normative Practices

Govert J. Buijs (Redaktør) ; Annette K. Mosher (Redaktør)

Serie: New Approaches to the Scientific Study of Religion 5

This book investigates humanities, social sciences and politics from the perspective of the concept of creation order. It is the second volume in a series that provides a unique and topical overview of attempts to assess the current health of the concept of creation order within Reformational philosophy when it is compared with other perspectives. Les mer
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This book investigates humanities, social sciences and politics from the perspective of the concept of creation order. It is the second volume in a series that provides a unique and topical overview of attempts to assess the current health of the concept of creation order within Reformational philosophy when it is compared with other perspectives. Divided into a section on fundamental reflections and a section on normative practices, it discusses issues such as redemption, beauty, nature, love, justice, morality, and ethics. It concludes with discussions on a practice-based theory to explain religion in international relations and a normative model for the practice of cooperation in development.



This series reflects the role that the branch of Christian philosophy called `Reformational' philosophy plays in the discussion on the status of laws of nature. Ever since its inception, almost a century ago, the concepts of order and law (principle, structure) have been at the heart of this philosophy. One way to characterise this tradition is as a philosophy of creation order. Firmly rejecting both scholastic metaphysics and Deism, Reformational philosophers have maintained the notion of law as `holding' for reality. Questions have arisen about the nature of such law: is it a religious or philosophical concept; does law just mean `orderliness'? How does it relate to laws of nature? Have they always existed or do they `emerge' during the process of evolution?

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