Understanding War as Punishment

Punitive Logics Beyond The State

The notion of crime is frequently used to justify military interventions. Thus military operations are reconstructed as a way of stopping crime and human rights violations and international punishment as a state practice. Les mer
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Vår pris: 1773,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Ikke i salg
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Om boka

The notion of crime is frequently used to justify military interventions. Thus military operations are reconstructed as a way of stopping crime and human rights violations and international punishment as a state practice. This book analyses the increasing overlap of criminology and international relations and explores the current use of military technology to control crime and human rights violations in the international sphere.

Drawing on the criminology of punishment, international relations theory and international law, this book examines the emergence of a system of international criminal justice and the transformation of international relations through the juridification of war. Focusing on case studies in Kosovo, Iraq, Libya, and Syria, the book offers a theoretical understanding of the relocation of punishment in the international arena.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

1. The emergence of the problem of military intervention as a mechanism to control crime in the international sphere, 2. Changing understanding of warfare: from the Vietnam War to "just wars", 3. Genealogy of the re-location of punishment in the international sphere and the establishment of the responsibility to protect, 4. Case studies: Kosovo, Iraq, Libya and Syria. The case of drones used in Yemen and Pakistan to fight terrorism. Extent to which different discourses are utilised: crime control/responsibility to protect/etc, 5. Principles of punishment in the international sphere, 6. Theoretical coda