Browned Flavors

Analysis, Formation, and Physiology

Michael Granvogl (Redaktør) ; Devin Peterson (Redaktør) ; Peter Schieberle (Redaktør)

"Browned flavors" are closely linked to the Maillard reaction, especially in the mind of food chemists. This well-known reaction was linked with the name of the French chemist and physicist Louis Camille Maillard. Les mer
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Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

Om boka

"Browned flavors" are closely linked to the Maillard reaction, especially in the mind of food chemists. This well-known reaction was linked with the name of the French chemist and physicist Louis Camille Maillard. The reaction includes several "sub-reactions", based on interactions of amino acids and carbohydrates, and leads to a large diversity of molecules. It is also commonly known as "non-enzymatic browning reactions". Beside colorings, also desired aroma-active,
taste-active, and physiologically-active compounds are generated, mainly by thermal influence.

Due to the importance of the reaction to the food sector, including academia, industry, and also governmental institutions, this book examines all aspects and applications of the Maillard reaction, including in cocoa, raw and roasted mustard seeds, oats, sugars, potato chips, wheat and rye.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Preface
1. On the Role of Amadori Rearrangement Products as Precursors of Aroma-Active Strecker Aldehydes in Cocoa
2. Use of Galvanic Cell Voltages To Clock the Progress of Maillard Reactions in Real Time
3. Controlling Amino Acid Degradations Produced by Reactive Carbonyls in Foods
4. Reducing the Acrylamide-Forming Potential of Wheat, Rye and Potato: A Review
5. Characterization of Browning Formation in Orange Juice during Storage
6. A Three Dimensional Kinetic Model for the Formation of Acrylamide in French Fries with Variable Glucose and Fructose Content
7. The Maillard Reaction Product N?-Carboxymethyl-L-Lysine Induces Heat Shock Proteins 72 and 90-alpha via RAGE Interaction in HEK-293 Cells
8. Characterization of Key Aroma-Active Compounds in Raw and Roasted White Mustard Seeds (Sinapis alba L.)
9. Formation of Reactive Fragmentation Products during the Maillard Degradation of Reducing Sugars--A Review
10. Relationship between Alkylpyrazine and Acrylamide Formation in Potato
Editors' Biographies
Indexes

Om forfatteren

Michael Granvogl (Ph.D., Technical University of Munich) is currently an Associate Professor at the Chair of Food Chemistry, Technical University of Munich, Germany. He works on projects dealing with the analysis and formation of desired (aroma-active) and undesired (food-borne-toxicants) bio-actives in foods.

Devin Peterson is a Professor in the Department of Food Science and Technology at The Ohio State University. He earned a doctoral degree in Flavor Chemistry (2001) at the U. of Minnesota. In 2001 he joined the faculty in the Department of Food Science at Penn State University for eight years. In 2009 he returned to the University of Minnesota as an Associate Professor and was promoted to Professor in 2014. In 2016, he relocated his research program to the Ohio State University as part of the
discovery themes initiate, a unique investment in agriculture research.

Prof. Dr. Peter Schieberle studied Chemistry at the Technical University of Aachen and Food Chemistry at the University of Bonn. He received his diploma degree in Food Chemistry in 1977, and his PhD from the Technical University Munich in 1980. After becoming a Lecturer at the University Erlangen-Nuremberg in 1989 and, also at the Technical University of Munich, he then served as a Full Professor for Food Chemistry at the University of Wuppertal from 1993 to 1995. Since 1995, he holds the Chair
of Food Chemistry at the Technical University of Munich.