Twenty-one Mental Models That Can Change Policing

A Framework for Using Data and Research for Overcoming Cognitive Bias

«<p>"Complexity, wicked problems, big–data, and a growing body of police research are examples of what chief executives must understand in today’s contemporary policing environment to be successful. Mental models can aid in the decomposition of these complexities. Dr. Mitchell’s book is the first to amalgamate the concept of mental models and police decision-making by providing a critical thinking framework for police leaders to follow in a pragmatic, easy to follow format. Dr. Mitchell’s teachings will challenge the readers’ assumptions on how they make decisions. As police leaders, it is time we move the needle forward and examine how we make policy decisions in society’s name. This book is a bold step forward."</p> <p><strong>Commander Chris G. Vallejo,</strong> <em>Austin (TX) Police Department</em></p> <p>"Dr. Renee Mitchell does an outstanding job of discussing her unique approach to utilizing mental modeling to incorporate the use of data and researc»

This book goes beyond other police leadership books to teach practitioners how to think about policing in a structured way that synthesizes criminological theory, statistics, research design, applied research, and what works and what doesn't in policing into Mental Models. Les mer
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Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

Om boka

This book goes beyond other police leadership books to teach practitioners how to think about policing in a structured way that synthesizes criminological theory, statistics, research design, applied research, and what works and what doesn't in policing into Mental Models. A Mental Model is a representation of how something works. Using a Mental Model framework to simplify complex concepts, readers will take away an in-depth understanding of how cognitive biases affect our ability to understand and interpret data, what empirical research says about effective police interventions, how statistical data should be structured for management meetings, and how to evaluate interventions for efficiency and effectiveness.


While evidence-based practice is critical to advancing the police profession, it is limited in scope, and is only part of what is necessary to support sustainable change in policing. Policing requires a scientifically based framework to understand and interpret data in a way that minimizes cognitive bias to allow for better responses to complex problems. Data and research have advanced so rapidly in the last several decades that it is difficult for even the most ambitious of police leaders to keep pace. The Twenty-one Mental Models were synthesized to create a framework for any police, public, or community leader to better understand how cognitive bias contributes to misunderstanding data and gives the reader the tools to overcome those biases to better serve their communities.


The book is intended for a wide range of audiences, including law enforcement and community leaders; scholars and policy experts who specialize in policing; students of criminal justice, organizations, and management; reporters and journalists; individuals who aspire to police careers; and citizen consumers of information about policing. Anyone who is going to make decisions about their communities based on data has a responsibility to be numerate and this book Twenty-one Mental Models That Can Change Policing: A Framework For Using Data and Research For Overcoming Cognitive Bias, will help you become just that.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Prologue: The Shoulders of Giants





Introduction: What is a Mental Model and How Does It Help Policing





Part I: How We Think





Mental Model #1: System 1 and 2
Mental Model #2: Cognitive Bias
Mental Model #3: First Principles Thinking
The Mental Models in Practice I: Mental Models 1-3





Part II: How We Think About Math





Mental Model #4: False Linear Thinking
Mental Model #5: Binary Percent Changes
Mental Model #6: Second Order Thinking
The Mental Models in Practice II: Mental Models 4-6





Part III: How Things Concentrate





Mental Model #7: Pareto Principle
Mental Model #8: The Law of Crime Concentration
Mental Model #9: Felonious Few
The Mental Models in Practice III: Mental Models 7-9





Part IV: How Things Vary


Mental Model #10: Distributions
Mental Model #11: Law of Large Numbers
Mental Model #12: Regression to the Mean
The Mental Models in Practice IV: Mental Models 10-12





Part V: How to Determine Causality


Mental Model #13: Correlation is Not Causation
Mental Model #14: Causal Inference
Mental Model #15: Bayesian (Probabilistic) Reasoning
The Mental Models in Practice V: Mental Models 13-15





Part VI: How to Think Scientifically





Mental Model #16: Peer Review Your Perspectives
Mental Model #17: The Scientific Method
Mental Model #18: Evidence-based Practices
The Mental Models in Practice VI: Mental Models 16-18





Part VII: How to Make Decisions





Mental Model #19: Targeting, Testing, and Tracking
Mental Model #20: Harm Indexes
Mental Model #21: Decision-making Models
The Mental Models in Practice VII: Mental Models 19-21





Part VIII: How to Apply it All





Conclusion: How the Twenty-one Mental Models Can Improve Policing and Reduce Cognitive Bias
Mental Model Method: How it all Fits Together Mental Models 1-21





Notes

Om forfatteren

Renée J. Mitchell served in the Sacramento Police Department for twenty-two years and is currently a Senior Police Researcher with RTI International. She holds a B.S. in Psychology, a M.A. in Counseling Psychology, a M.B.A., a J.D., and a Ph.D. in Criminology from the University of Cambridge. She has taught and lectured internationally on evidence-based policing and is best known for being the first policing pracademic to run a randomized controlled trial. She was a Fulbright Police Research Fellow and is the co-founder and executive committee member of the American Society of Evidence-Based Policing. She has two TEDx talks, "Research Not Protests" and "Policing Needs to Change: Trust me I’m a Cop," where she advocates for evidence-based policing. She has published her research in the Journal of Experimental Criminology, Justice Quarterly, and the Cambridge Journal of Evidence-Based Policing. Her books include Evidence Based Policing: An introduction and Implementing Evidence-Based Research: A How-to Guide for Police Organizations.