Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic - 
      Emma Greensmith

Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic

Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation

This book offers a radically new reading of Quintus' Posthomerica, the first account to combine a literary and cultural-historical understanding of what is the most important Greek epic written at the height of the Roman Empire. Les mer
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This book offers a radically new reading of Quintus' Posthomerica, the first account to combine a literary and cultural-historical understanding of what is the most important Greek epic written at the height of the Roman Empire. In Emma Greensmith's ground-breaking analysis, Quintus emerges as a key poet in the history of epic and of Homeric reception. Writing as if he is Homer himself, and occupying the space between the Iliad and the Odyssey, Quintus constructs a new 'poetics of the interval'. At all levels, from its philology to its plotting, the Posthomerica manipulates the language of affiliation, succession and repetition not just to articulate its own position within the inherited epic tradition but also to contribute to the literary and identity politics of imperial society. This book changes how we understand the role of epic and Homer in Greco-Roman culture - and completely re-evaluates Quintus' status as a poet.
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Forlag: Cambridge University Press
Innbinding: Paperback
Språk: Engelsk
ISBN: 9781108820653
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Preface; List of illustrations; Acknowledgements; Beginning again (introduction): the poetics of impersonation; Part I. Quintus as Homer: Illusion and Imitation: 1. Enlarging the space: imperial doubleness, fixity, expansion; 2. Writing homer: language, composition and style; Part II. Quintus as Quintus: Antagonism and Assimilation: 3. When homer quotes callimachus: the proem (not) in the middle; 4. Selective memory and iliadic revision; 5. Prodigal poetics: filiation and succession; 6. Temporality and the homeric not yet; Bibliography.
Emma Greensmith is Associate Professor of Classical Languages and Literature at St John's College, Oxford. She specialises in imperial Greek literature. She previously held a Research Fellowship at Jesus College, Cambridge, and a Visiting Assistant Professorship at Colgate University, New York. She was a member of the AHRC-funded collaborative project 'Imperial Greek Epic: A Cultural History'.