The Oxford Handbook of the Operatic Canon

Cormac Newark (Redaktør) ; William Weber (Redaktør)

Opera has always been a vital and complex mixture of commercial and aesthetic concerns, of bourgeois politics and elite privilege. In its long heyday in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it came to occupy a special place not only among the arts but in urban planning, too - this is, perhaps surprisingly, often still the case. Les mer
Vår pris
1856,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Vår pris: 1856,-

(Innbundet) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Om boka

Opera has always been a vital and complex mixture of commercial and aesthetic concerns, of bourgeois politics and elite privilege. In its long heyday in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it came to occupy a special place not only among the arts but in urban planning, too - this is, perhaps surprisingly, often still the case. The Oxford Handbook of the Operatic Canon examines how opera has become the concrete edifice it was never meant to be, by
tracing its evolution from a market entirely driven by novelty to one of the most canonic art forms still in existence.

Throughout the book, a lively assembly of musicologists, historians, and industry professionals tackle key questions of opera's past, present, and future. Why did its canon evolve so differently from that of concert music? Why do its top ten titles, all more than a century old, now account for nearly a quarter of all performances worldwide? Why is this system of production becoming still more top-heavy, even while the repertory seemingly expands, notably to include early music?

Topics range from the seventeenth century to the present day, from Russia to England and continental Europe to the Americas. To reflect the contested nature of many of them, each is addressed in paired chapters. These complement each other in different ways: by treating the same geographical location in different periods, by providing different national or regional perspectives on the same period, or by thinking through similar conceptual issues in contrasting or changing contexts. Posing its
questions in fresh, provocative terms, The Oxford Handbook of the Operatic Canon challenges scholarly assumptions in music and cultural history, and reinvigorates the dialogue with an industry that is, despite everything, still growing.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Note to the reader
Contributors
Acknowledgements

General Introduction
Idiosyncrasies of the operatic canon
Cormac Newark and William Weber

Part 1. History, geography

Introduction to Chapters 1 and 2
Foundations: France and Italy in the eighteenth century
Michel Noiray and Franco Piperno

Chapater 1. The practical and symbolic functions of pre-Rameau opera at the Paris Opera before Gluck
Michel Noiray

Chapter 2. Italian opera and the concept of "canon" in the late eighteenth century
Franco Piperno

Introduction to Chapters 3 and 4
From royal authority to public taste in Berlin, 1740-1815
John Mangum and Katherine Hambridge

Chapter 3. The repertory of the Italian Court Opera in Berlin, 1740-1786
John Mangum

Chapter 4. Catching up and getting ahead: The opera house as temple of art in Berlin c. 1800
Katherine Hambridge

Introduction to Chapters 5 and 6
Operatic practices at the London Opera: Pasticcio to repertory to canon?
Michael Burden and Jennifer Hall-Witt

Chapter 5. From recycled performances to repertoire at the King's Theatre in London, 1705-1820
Michael Burden

Chapter 6. Repertory opera and canonic sensibility at the London opera, 1820-1860
Jennifer Hall-Witt

Introduction to chapters 7 and 8
From capital-city opera house to provincial theaters in France
Patrick Taieb, Sabine Teulon Lardic and Yannick Simon

Chapter 7. The evolution of French opera repertories in provincial theaters: Three epochs, 1770-1900
Patrick Taieb and Sabine Teulon Lardic

Chapter 8. The mingling of opera genres: Canonic opera at the Theatre des Arts in Rouen, 1882-1897
Yannick Simon

Introduction to chapters 9 and 10
The Italian opera world and its canons
Carlotta Sorba and Jutta Toelle

Chapter 9. Theaters, markets, and canonic implications in the Italian opera system, 1820-1880
Carlotta Sorba

Chapter 10. Operatic canons and repertories in Italy around 1900
Jutta Toelle

Introduction to chapters 11 and 12
Opera in the Western Hemisphere, 1811-1910: New York, Buenos Aires, and Montevideo
Karen Ahlquist and Benjamin Walton

Chapter 11. International opera in nineteenth-century New York: Core repertories and canonic values
Karen Ahlquist

Chapter 12. Canons