Climate Change and Security

A Gathering Storm of Global Challenges

Human-induced climate change is causing resource scarcities, natural disasters, and mass migrations, which in turn destabilize national, international, and human security structures and multiply the human inputs to climate change. Les mer
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Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

Om boka

Human-induced climate change is causing resource scarcities, natural disasters, and mass migrations, which in turn destabilize national, international, and human security structures and multiply the human inputs to climate change.

Alarms about the expanding role of climate change as a force multiplier of existing threats to national, international, and human security structures studies are being raised at all levels of governance and intelligence-national (including the U.S. Senate, the Director of National Intelligence, the Central Intelligence Agency, and the Pentagon), transnational (including the European Union and the United Nations), and private (such as the Central News Agency and the American Security Project). Climate Change and Security: A Gathering Storm of Global Challenges focuses on the three major feedback effects of human-induced climate change on human and international security-resource scarcity, natural disasters, and sea-level rise.



Decreasing per capita availability of renewable resources due to such regional effects of climate change as drought and desertification leads to intensified competition for these resources and may result in armed violence-especially when compounded by conditions of rapid population growth, tribalism, and sectarianism, as in Darfur and Somalia. The increase in the frequency and intensity of meteorological disasters associated with global warming weakens already debilitated tropical societies and makes them still more vulnerable to political instability, as in Haiti. Sea-level rise will lead to disruptive mass migrations of climate refugees as dense littoral populations are forced to abandon low-lying coastal regions, as in Bangladesh.









Presents tables and figures



Maps



A bibliography at the end of each chapter

Fakta

Om forfatteren

"There are two overriding concerns for any national government: economy and security. Climate change threatens both. It is no surprise that both finance ministers and military chiefs take an interest in climate change, once the compound of scientists and environmentalists. Irrespective of the debate over the quality of some of the climate change science, the top brass know all too well that trouble lies ahead if climates do change. Christian Webersik has given us all a great service in covering the many features of climate change and security with a detailed analysis of one of the most imperiled 'failed states', Somalia. This is a magisterial narrative which bears reading and assimilating by everyone who acts for a peaceful planet." -- Professor Timothy O'Riordan, OBE, DL, FBA Emeritus Professor of Environmental Sciences University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK "Webersik makes a strong case for situating climate change and security links squarely within a human security context. He brings climate change down from the airy (and some might say disconnected) heights of carbon mitigation negotiations to focus on the very tangible realm of resource scarcity, natural disasters, and migration impacts. These impacts, and the cascading social, political, and economic reactions to them, constitute a critical human security agenda that demands early action to go with early warning. Webersik is one of the first to recognize the potentially destabilizing impacts of climate mitigation and adaptation. Climate debates to date have nearly missed this topic entirely and Webersik emphatically does not make this mistake. -- Geoffrey D. Dabelko, Director, Environmental Change and Security Program, Woodrow Wilson Center and co-editor of Environmental Peacemaking "Will climate change produce more security threats? Climate study scholars easily answer 'yes' in their natural wish to be more alarmist; whereas security study scholars are hesitant to revisit what have been long established as causes of conflict. This marvelous book critically assesses both scientific sides and attempts to identify links, as numerous and problematic as they could be, between clim