Jobs with Inequality - John  Peters

Jobs with Inequality

Financialization, Post-Democracy, and Labour Market Deregulation in Canada

Income inequality has skyrocketed in Canada over the past few decades. The rich have become richer, while the average household income has deteriorated and job quality has plummeted. Common explanations for these trends point to globalization, technology, or other forces largely beyond our control. Les mer
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Income inequality has skyrocketed in Canada over the past few decades. The rich have become richer, while the average household income has deteriorated and job quality has plummeted. Common explanations for these trends point to globalization, technology, or other forces largely beyond our control. But, as Jobs with Inequality shows, there is nothing inevitable about inequality. Rather, runaway inequality is the result of politics and policies - what governments have done to aid the rich and boost finance and what they have not done to uphold the interests of workers.


Drawing on new tax and income data, John Peters tells the story of how inequality is unfolding in Canada today by examining post-democracy, financialization, and labour market deregulation. Timely and novel, Jobs with Inequality explains how and why business and government have rewritten the rules of the economy to the advantage of the few, and considers why progressive efforts to reverse these trends have so regularly run aground.
List of Figures and Tables
Acknowledgements
1. Introduction
2. Bringing Finance and Post-Democracy into the Labour Market Inequality Debate
3. Tracing the Rise of Financialization in Canada
4. Canada in International Context
5. British Columbia: Neo-liberal Reform and Deregulation
6. Newfoundland and Labrador: Institutional Stasis During the Oil Boom
7. Ontario: Policy Drift in Canada’s Financial and Industrial Heartland
8. Conclusion: Rethinking the Political Economy of Inequality
Appendix A: Data Definitions and Sources
Appendix B: Interview Sources by Case
Appendix C: Methods and Research Design
Reference
John Peters is an associated professor and research fellow at the University of Montreal’s Interuniversity Research Centre on Globalization and Work (CRIMT).