Food, Masculinities, and Home

Interdisciplinary Perspectives

; Victor Buchli ; Michelle Szabo (Redaktør) ; Shelley L. Koch (Redaktør)

Food, Masculinities, and Home

Long-held associations between women, home, food, and cooking are beginning to unravel as, in a growing number of households, men are taking on food and cooking responsibilities. Les mer
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Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager

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Food, Masculinities, and Home

Long-held associations between women, home, food, and cooking are beginning to unravel as, in a growing number of households, men are taking on food and cooking responsibilities. At the same time, men's public foodwork continues to gain attention in the media and popular culture. The first of its kind, Food, Masculinities and Home focuses specifically on food in relation to how homemaking practices shape masculine identities and transform meanings of 'home'. The international, multidisciplinary contributors explore questions including how food practices shape masculinity and notions of home, and vice versa; the extent to which this gender shift challenges existing gender hierarchies; and how masculinities are being reshaped by the growing presence of men in kitchens and food-focused spaces.

With ever-growing interest in both food and gender studies, this is a must-read for students and researchers in food studies, gender studies, cultural studies, sociology, geography, anthropology, and related fields.

List of Tables
List of Contributors

Series Preface: Why Home?
Rosie Cox, Birkbeck, University of London, UK, and Victor Buchli, University College London, UK

Introduction
Shelley Koch, Emory & Henry College, USA, and Michelle Szabo, Sheridan College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning, Canada

Section I: The Production of 'Masculinity' and 'Home' through Food: Empirical Studies of Masculinity and Home Cooking

Chapter 1: Cooking up Manliness: A Practice-Based Approach to Men's At-Home Cooking and Attitudes Using Time-Use Diary Data
Sarah Daniels and Ignace Glorieux, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

Chapter 2: "Women Have a Gift for Cooking": Israeli Male Teachers' View of Domestic Cookery
Liora Gvion and Dorit Patkin, The Kibbutizm College of Education, Israel

Chapter 3: Transnational Domestic Masculinity: Japanese Men's Home Cooking in Australia
Iori Hamada, University of Melbourne, Australia

Chapter 4: Stumbling in the Kitchen: Exploring Masculinity, Latinicity and Belonging through Performative Cooking
Marcos D. Moldes, Simon Fraser University, Canada

Chapter 5: From "The Missus used to cook" to "Get the recipe book and get stuck into it": Reconstructing Masculinities in Older Men
Lauren Williams, Griffith University, Australia, and John Germov, University of Newcastle, Australia

Chapter 6: Men's Foodwork in Food Systems: Social Representations of Masculinities and Cooking at Home
Jeffrey Sobal, Cornell University, USA

Section II: Discourses of Men's and Boys' Home Cooking in Popular Culture and the Media

Chapter 7: Cool Kids Cook: Girls and Boys in the Foodie Kitchen
Elizabeth Fakazis, University of Wisconsin, USA

Chapter 8: "Wish I was a better boy. Nothing pertikeler for tea": Food, Boyhood, and Masculine Appetite in Nineteenth-Century Women's Coming of Age Novels
Samantha Christensen, University of Alberta, Canada

Chapter 9: "If you want to, you can do it!": Home Cooking and Masculinity Makeover in Le Chef Contre-Attaque
Jonatan Leer, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Chapter 10: Kitchen Mishaps: Performances of Masculine Domesticity in American Comedy Films
Fabio Parasecoli, The New School, USA

Chapter 11: Chefs at Home? Masculinities on Offer in Celebrity Chef Cookbooks
Alexandra Rodney and Josee Johnston, University of Toronto, Canada

Chapter 12: Don't Try This At Home: Men on TV, Women in the Kitchen
Ellen Cox, Transylvania University, USA

Bibliography
Index

The first book dedicated to the relationship between masculinities, home, and food.

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