The Shifting Landscape of the American School District

Race, Class, Geography, and the Perpetual Reform of Local Control, 1935-2015

David Gamson (Redaktør) ; Emily Hodge (Redaktør)

Serie: History of Schools and Schooling 62

The Shifting Landscape of the American School District offers a new perspective on the American school district. The educational system of the United States has long been characterized by its tradition of local control, and the district has symbolized community involvement in education. Les mer
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Paperback
Legg i
Vår pris: 559,-

(Paperback) Fri frakt!
Leveringstid: Sendes innen 21 dager
På grunn av Brexit-tilpasninger og tiltak for å begrense covid-19 kan det dessverre oppstå forsinket levering.

Om boka

The Shifting Landscape of the American School District offers a new perspective on the American school district. The educational system of the United States has long been characterized by its tradition of local control, and the district has symbolized community involvement in education. Scholars have written insightful studies on individual city systems and school districts, but rarely has the district-as an organizational form itself-been the subject of scrutiny, and Americans have continued to take the district for granted as the primary unit of local schooling. In recent years reformers have also built many of their innovations upon the belief that it is the traditional, bureaucratic, hierarchical district that requires overhaul. The Shifting Landscape of the American School District seeks to challenge that perception. The editors argue that the pervasive view of district history-the notion that the school district is a holdover from the progressive reforms of the early twentieth century-has shrouded a fascinating story of the ways in which districts have evolved, innovated, and reacted in response to state and federal mandates, national reform movements, demographic shifts, desegregation, structural/organizational changes, and a shifting political climate. The chapters in this volume offer compelling evidence of the many ways that districts have expanded, contracted, integrated, consolidated, reorganized, and been torn apart over the past century. By covering a wide range of time periods, the authors are able to draw fascinating parallels between the past and present.

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Figures and Tables - David A. Gamson and Emily M. Hodge: Preface: Re-examining the American School District - David A. Gamson and Emily M. Hodge: The Relentless Reinvention of the American School District - John L. Rury and Sanae Akaba: The Geo-Spatial Distribution of Educational Attainment: School Districts, Cultural Capital and Inequality in Metropolitan Kansas City, 1960-1980 - Emily M. Hodge: District Consolidation, Detracking, and School Choice: Lessons from the Woodland Hills School District in Western Pennsylvania - Genevieve Siegel-Hawley and Stefani Thachik: Crossing the Line? School District Responses to Demographic Change in the South - Ansley T. Erickson: Fairness, Commitment, and Civic Capacity: The Varied Desegregation Trajectories of Metropolitan School Districts - Emily E. Straus: From the District to the State to the Nation: How a High-needs District became the Testing Ground for Federal High-stakes Accountability Policies - Karen Benjamin: The Limits of Top-Down Versus Bottom-Up Educational Reform During the Great Depression - Norm Fruchter, Toi Sin Arvidsson, Christina Mokhtar, and John Beam: Demographics and Performance in New York City's School Networks: An Initial Inquiry - Tina M. Trujillo, Laura E. Hernandez, and Rene Espinoza Kissell: Enduring Dilemmas in Democratic Urban District Reform: The Oakland Case - Judith Kafka: Institutional Theory and the History of District-level School Reform: A Reintroduction - Contributors.

Om forfatteren

David A. Gamson (Ph.D., Stanford University) is Associate Professor of Education in the Department of Education Policy Studies at The Pennsylvania State University. His research focuses on educational policy and school reform, past and present. Gamson has written about the role of school districts in Progressive Era reform and, more recently, has been studying the evolving roles and responsibilities of the school district since World War II, the changes to policies designed to provide equal educational opportunities over the past century, and the use of academic standards before the 1980s. Gamson has been a fellow in the Advanced Studies Fellowship Program at Brown University and a National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellow. His publications have appeared in Educational Researcher; Paedagogica Historica; the Journal of Educational Administration; Mind, Brain, and Education; Intelligence; and the 2007 Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education. His book, The Importance of Being Urban, is forthcoming. During the 2015-2016 academic year, he was a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation.





Emily M. Hodge (Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University) is Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership at Montclair State University in New Jersey. Her work uses historical and qualitative methods, as well as social network analysis, to understand the changing nature of strategies for educational equity. Recent projects have explored how educational systems, schools, and teachers negotiate the tension between standardization and differentiation in the context of the Common Core State Standards, and the varied strategies state education agencies are using to support standards implementation. Hodge is a recipient of a Small Research Grant from the Spencer Foundation. Her research appears in Educational Policy, English Teaching: Practice and Critique, Education Law and Policy Review, Review of Research in Education, and AERA Open.