Bears

Archaeological and Ethnohistorical Perspectives in Native Eastern North America

Heather A. Lapham (Redaktør) ; Gregory A. Waselkov (Redaktør)

Although scholars have long recognized the mythic status of bears in Indigenous North American societies of the past, this is the first volume to synthesize the vast amount of archaeological and historical research on the topic. Les mer
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Om boka

Although scholars have long recognized the mythic status of bears in Indigenous North American societies of the past, this is the first volume to synthesize the vast amount of archaeological and historical research on the topic. Bears charts the special relationship between the American black bear and humans in eastern Native American cultures across thousands of years.

These essays draw on zooarchaeological, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic evidence from nearly 300 archaeological sites from Quebec to the Gulf of Mexico. Contributors explore the ways bears have been treated as something akin to another kind of human-in the words of anthropologist Irving Hallowell, "other than human persons"-in Algonquian, Cherokee, Iroquois, Meskwaki, Creek, and many other Native cultures. Case studies focus on bear imagery in Native art and artifacts; the religious and economic significance of bears and bear products such as meat, fat, oil, and pelts; bears in Native worldviews, kinship systems, and cosmologies; and the use of bears as commodities in transatlantic trade. The case studies in Bears demonstrate that bears were not only a source of food, but were also religious, economic, and political icons within Indigenous cultures. This volume convincingly portrays the black bear as one of the most socially significant species in Native eastern North America. A volume in the Florida Museum of Natural History: Ripley P. Bullen Series

Fakta

Innholdsfortegnelse

Introduction-Heather A. Lapham
Chapter 1 Ethnohistorical and Ethnographic Overview of Bear-Human Relationships in Native Eastern North America-Gregory A. Waselkov
Chapter 2 "Dear, Honored Guest": Bear Ceremonialism in Minnesota-David Mather
Chapter 3 The Great White Bear in Cosmology, Myth, Imagery, and Ritual-Thomas E. Berres
Chapter 4 The Multifaceted Bear: Spiritual and Economic Roles of Bears in Meskwaki Society-Ralph Koziarski
Chapter 5 Use of Black Bears in the Western Great Lakes Region, and the Riddle of the Perforated Bear Mandibles-Terrance J. Martin
Chapter 6 Black Bears and the Iroquoians: Food, Stories, and Symbols-Christian Gates St-Pierre, Claire St-Germain, and Louis-Vincent Laperriere-Desorcy
Chapter 7 In Feast and Famine: New Perspectives on Black Bear in the Southern Appalachians and Piedmont, AD 1000-1800-Heather A. Lapham
Chapter 8 Better than Butter: Yona Go'i' Bear Grease in Cherokee Culture-Heidi M. Altman, Tanya M. Peres, and J. Matthew Compton
Chapter 9 Bears, Bear-Grounds, and Bovines in the Lower Southeast-Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman
Chapter 10 Re-Examining the Evidence for Bear Ceremonialism in the Lower Mississippi Valley-Ashley Peles and Megan C. Kassabaum
Chapter 11 Menageries and Bearskin Caps: Experiencing North American Bears in Post-Medieval Britain-Hannah J. O'Regan
Chapter 12 Bear-Human Relationships in Eastern Native North America: An Overview of Archaeological and Ethnohistorical Evidence-Gregory A. Waselkov and J. Lynn Funkhouser
Contributors